Bonding A New Boar With Established Couple Of Boars

Diddlers

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Hi there,

I recently adopted the most calm and beautiful little boy. My hope is to integrate him with my two current boys, who get on well together and never had any problem. There is a definite dominant in the pair, but they are respectful to each other.

They were all introduced together yesterday in floor time, not in their hutch, and the two existing loved the new baby and we making good noises following him around, but then the established couple seemed to get jealous of each other, started chattering teeth at each other trying to fight, which they have never done before. After a cuddle together on my lap with more vegetables, they are friends again, but I kept the baby separate again.

What should I do? Should I try them again together? The fact that they both get on with the baby is a good sign, but realistically, is it unlikely they will ever be okay together as a trio? Should I keep trying or should I stop - I do not want to put them under stress.
 

Katiedid

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Boar trios are notoriously unstable. I can't tell you it wont work as there are a few which do - but I understand that most don't. I wanted to increase my herd (in a single enclosure) so I waited until I had a solo boar (neutered) and added females. I think your greatest risk is that you have a bonded pair and the new one could upset that bond whilst not norming a bond with either and you could end up with 3 solo piggies. I wouldn't try it (I would do 2 pairs) but there is a lot of info at the top of the bonding page which may assist you if you want to look into it.
 

Diddlers

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Boar trios are notoriously unstable. I can't tell you it wont work as there are a few which do - but I understand that most don't. I wanted to increase my herd (in a single enclosure) so I waited until I had a solo boar (neutered) and added females. I think your greatest risk is that you have a bonded pair and the new one could upset that bond whilst not norming a bond with either and you could end up with 3 solo piggies. I wouldn't try it (I would do 2 pairs) but there is a lot of info at the top of the bonding page which may assist you if you want to look into it.
Thank you :) was so worried about what to do, just want to do the right thing for them. I will keep the little baby separate and get a companion. :)
 

Reenie

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That's the best idea. The last thing you want to do is upset your current bond and end up with three singles. I have three boys, who have been together since birth, but I can see already where the break is going to be. (Poor Groucho looks like he will eventually have to have a new buddy) They're still quite young, and have a lot of teenage months ahead, so I've got B plan on standby.
 

Diddlers

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Do you think there will be a problem with the established couple being in a hutch in the same room as the little baby and companion in a hutch ?
 

Wiebke

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Thank you :) was so worried about what to do, just want to do the right thing for them. I will keep the little baby separate and get a companion. :)
Hi!

If you can, please contact one of these recommended rescues to find your little boy a character compatible friend. This helps to stabilise the bond while you little boy is going through the tricky hormonal teenage months between 4-14 months of age. Unlike the persistent myth, boars of all ages can be bonded, provided that the boars can choose each other under expert supervision - which is where shops and for-sale breeders falls horribly short. Please also be aware that there is not licensing or control in place for either breeders or rescues, so in effect anybody can call themselves a rescue or a breeder, and the results can be accordingly.

Trios have a fail rate of over 50% at the best of times, but once you add sub-adult boys into the mix, it shoots right up. If you have the space, please keep two pairs. The temptation to add another boy to a happy couple is unfortunately very high.

Recommended good standard UK rescues: Guinea Pig Rescue Centre Locator
Recommended rescues in some other countries: Guinea Lynx :: Rescue Organizations
These rescues all practise a mandatory quarantine and only rehome properly sexed, healthy and (when rehoming pairs) carefully matched ones. They are by far the safest place to get guinea pigs from without any nasty surprises. You also have the backing of the rescue if there is trouble with your bond.
 

Shadow22

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I keep my three boars together and they get along perfectly. They chased at first, but settled after a few hours and now live happily together. I suggest keeping them together for a week or two and keeping a close eye on them, if you h avnt already gotten another companion for him.
 
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