Brother against brother

Denflo

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I adopted two guinea pigs about 2 weeks ago. The bigger one would intimidate the smaller one every once in a while. Last night and this morning (it's 4:30 a.m.) and they are still going at it, I took the smaller one out (Oreo) and held him for quite awhile till the larger one (Max) calmed down. Then I sat with Max for a while. As soon as they got back together, Max would jump on Oreo's back and not let him move. I turned out all the lights except for this light on my desk, and put a cover over the cage. Seems to have quieted down, but I'm afraid it will start up again. Any suggestions, and is this normal?
 

David Piggie Lover

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Oh my. Pls read the very informative help about bonding relationships etc on this forum.
Your boys are sorting themselves out. . fighting is not good at all. You need to keep a watch on them.
The advise will help.
Best of luck and tell piggies to behave lol.
 

Piggies&buns

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it’s not intimidation, mounting is an entirely normal dominance behaviour in boars, even in well bonded boars. As long their relationship is functioning and a happy one, then you absolutely will see it again but it is nothing to be concerned about. How old are they? If they are within their teens 4-14 months of age (or coming up to it)then you are going to see a lot of hormonal displays of dominance. Even in my 2.5 year old boars, they still get hormonal and go on a mounting, rumbling and chasing spree every now and then.

the more you separate them, the more they will do it when you put them back together. It’s best, when it is dominance behaviours, that you just let them get on with it and don’t intervene too much. however, if it is a hormonal burst, relentless and your submissive needs a break, then it is fine to give them some cool down time. It is vital you handle the dominant piggy first, not the submissive. if you handle the submissive first, then it can make the dominant be more dominant to reinforce his position in the hierarchy

you only need to separate them if you see a full on, rolling around, blood drawing fight. That requires immediate and permanent separation as their bond is broken.
Bullying can happen but it is so important to not muddle it up with normal boar behaviour. If the submissive piggy is never allowed to eat or rest and is constantly being chased, losing weight due to not eating, looks depressed, then a trial separation can be carried out.

the guides below will help with further information on boar behaviours

A Comprehensive Guide to Guinea Pig Boars
Boars: Teenage, Bullying, Fighting, Fall-outs And What Next?
Dominance Behaviours In Guinea Pigs
Bonds In Trouble
 

Wiebke

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I fully agree with @Piggies&buns on all points.

Please take the time to read the green guide links. You will find them very helpful.
 

Denflo

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I really appreciate all the wonderful help. This is all new to me and I see now that I was handling it wrong. I took the submissive one out and cuddled with him because I hated hearing him squeal. OK, I will tie myself to the chair so I don't jump up and separate them unless the little one is really in trouble. I have no idea what their ages are, but there is a difference in size. Thanks again
 
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