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Difficult decision - experienced peeps only please

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Pebble

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Beechie guinea has been in considerable (gut) pain for the last 8 months....only relieved by metacam ...whic long term *** wreck his kidneys .....

Recenty he has been diagnosed with a mass - 4-5cm on Xray, It MAY be the souce of his pain but it's NOT definite.

It MAY be attched to the spleen...or the pancreas...or the liver...or the gut. ...we don;t know untill we "go in". Anythings else but the latter I am confident my vet can deal with.

He will need exploratory surgery - a 6-9cm incision...and f the mass is attached to the gut, we willl just be taking a biopsy and sewing him back up again...and in that case the long term progonsis isn;t very good at all....although I am confident he won;t have a problem with the surgery (stitches etc) per se.


Regardless - he needs to have a GA and have an 6-8cm exploratory incision....at a cost of £250 plus.

If it's anything but the gut ****... I am confident the vet can deal with/excise /close hin up................... and he will have a goodl life.

He is currenty chipper (although never ever as much as he was previously)...and this op could be the end of him.....or give him a much happier pain-free life


This is the most difficult decision I've ever had to make in my l;ife....positive input would be really appreciated as I have no idea which way i should turn for Beechies best interests......

Been in tears 3 nights running.......

x
 

Tracyxx

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Sorry hun could you just fill in the words that have some reason gone to stars **s so I know what you're asking :)
 

Pebble

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Ooops...just to clarify..he is a very healthy chunky abby at this moment...no other probs like teeth/fungal etc.and his breathing/fluid retention on lungs (he DOES have a **** with this) is under good control and vet isn't worried about a GA at this moment in time.....

x
 

Pebble

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Sorry hun could you just fill in the words that have some reason gone to stars **s so I know what you're asking :)
Bloomin blast them on line censors :)):))


OK no idea...but first one is probably "could " wreck his kidneys

Sceond one is "then" I am confident etc etc

HTH

Thanx for your prompt reply

x^)
 

Laura-CCC4

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Pebble, in all honesty I really would not know what to do at this stage either. If it is any help whatsoever I will share what experience I have of a "similar"(ish) problem.

A few years back I had worries with Charlie, my first pig, a gorgeous agouti Aby. In June 2007 he was peeing blood, I suspected bladder stone so sent him in to vets for x-ray. Vets found on x-ray, and consequently by palpating his abdomen, a large mass attached to his kidney, in vets opinion a kidney tumour. It was at that time the size of a small peach, perhaps ping pong ball size is more accurate, either way it was a notable size even on diagnosis. The vet essentially gave us three options:

1. Euthanasia. Most recommended by the vet.
2. Surgery to attempt to remove tumour. Vet gave 1% chance of survival, as blood loss is a major concern with the mass being attached to the kidney, and in his opinion post op recovery posed as much risk as the surgery itself.
3. Manage the effects of the tumour - pain relief.

After working through the shock of the diagnosis with my mum, together we decided option 1 was a no go, he was otherwise fit, healthy and extremely happy. Option 2 was a tricky one, as you are finding with your Beechie. In my head it was a huge battle of, well if it goes well it could give him far longer than if he's just left....but on the other hand it could finish off a pig who was otherwise absolutely fine. And I suspect that's the battle going on in your head too...? It's such a difficult one and I don't think there is a "right" answer.

With Charlie, unfortunately back then I hadn't the knowledge to request more specifics, and the vet was not brilliant (but the best at the practice). In turn it does mean I am a touch limited on how I can use Charlie's experience to help others, but I do hope that you can at least feel less alone, knowing that I too have had to face a difficult decision like this one.

What was a little sad is that when I moved to Wyton a few months after Charlie was diagnosed and first found Vedra, Vedra said if she had been able to see him when first diagnosed, she would have given him a good chance at coming through the op. Vedra did meet Charlie, as you gathered we went with option 3, of doing nothing other than keeping him as comfortable as possible. With Metacam and Reiki (energy healing) he survived nine months post op, passed in March 2008. His tumour was enormous by then, it took up over three quarters of his abdomen, which no doubt led to discomfort, but he was happy to potter about, loved me and his ladies, loved his food. He did end up being PTS, I suspect he suffered a stroke his final day but little rascal still didn't want to let go, but being unable to swallow there was never any doubt about what was right for him.
 

Pebble

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Thank you so much for sharing Laura......it means a lot ot me.

After reading your post...and spending the last few days thinking really hard.......I am going to put Beechie in for the op this week

His mass is almost liver-sized...and soon will start to impede on his other organs if it isnt; removed.

I wanted a pain-free outcome which is (quite rightly in the circumstances) not guaranteed by the vet,

Nevertheless, it's a "damnedf you do/damned if you don;t" scenario.
Pleasekeep Beechi in your thougts this next week

x
 

Laura-CCC4

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Will do, I hope all goes well, you know where I am if you need me. xx
 

Wiebke

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BIG HUG

There is never a "right/wrong" easy solution with these things. You have to weigh up the risks of an failed op against the comfort/discomfort Beechie is currently in and what his outlook is if he is kept strictly on palliative care.

I have had piggies die in or after an op, so I am very much aware what a difficult call it is and that you may have to have Beechie pts at one point if you decide against an operation. Sadly, in these situations, there are no easy choices left, and all you can do is try to find one that you think will give Beechie the best chance at a good life - however long or short that is!
 

Caviesgalore (EPGPR)

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Oh Pebble what a terrible position to find yourself in, you are absolutely right "damned if you do and damned if you don't":{

Many years ago we had a piggy who had all the signs of a bladder stone, but nothing was showing up on the x-ray. My vet ran every test possible on Roxy but we couldn't get to the bottom of why she was in constant pain/peeing blood. After many different meds which seemed to make no difference we opted to have an exploratory op as poor Roxy was really struggling. When we was opened up it transpired that her bladder was actually deformed and very thickened. Nicola gave everything a thorough flushing and put everything back together again.

Despite it being very touch and go I am pleased to say that Roxy pulled through her surgery and lived for another very happy 8 months. Her bladder problems did eventually mean we had to help her to RB but she was spoilt rotten during the additional time we had with her.

It goes without saying that we will be thinking of you this week and sending mega healing vibes. xx
 

Pebble

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Thanks everyone

I haven;t booked him in yet as the bathroom ceiling fell down yesterday evening courtesy of a sudden leak in the loft...I'm now worried about all the dust/dirt/disruption etc in view of the fact he will come home with a 6-9cm wound...may ask the vets to board him for a bit when I ring tomorrow.

x
 

Wiebke

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Things are not going for you at the moment, are they?

Sending you a hug and Beechie a cuddle!
 

Glynis

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Just read thru your post.....i'm so sorry love :(
I would also give it a go re the surgery, yes it might well be a bit risky but you have to give them a chance don't you :)
Whee all wish Beechie mega loves, nose rubs and healing loves xoxoxoxoxoxoxoxoxoxo

Glynis, Velvet and Onyx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
 
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