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Dental Month on from dental op, and guinea pig still losing weight and struggling to eat unaided

Carrotyd

Junior Guinea Pig
Joined
Dec 3, 2014
Messages
208
Likes
443
Points
370
Location
Surrey
#1
Hello all. We've had our rescue piggie Bruce for about 18 months now, and he is four years old. Within three months of us coming to live with us, he started to suffer dental issues, which I posted about here. Our vet diagnosed overgrowth of the back molars, and he was treated promptly and made a full recovery. So much so, his weight rebounded to 1.3kg.

The problem, however, re-occurred recently (13 months exactly to the day), after we tracked a steady, not-quite-weekly- decline in his body weight, from 1.3kg to 1.238kg. So he underwent a GA and had his back teeth trimmed again, as well as his front incisors too (which he didn't last time). The vet diagnosed him with a mis-aligned jaw during the course of this procedure, which is what she thinks is behind his recurring dental issues.

In the immediate aftermath of the operation, he seemed to be bouncing back as before, but struggling a little bit with his newly-trimmed front teeth. We compensated by stepping in with syringe feeds and chopping his vegetables into long spaghetti type strips, which he seemed to find easier to deal with. We gradually scaled back the syringe feeds when we noticed he was maintaining his weight at around the 1.240kg with relative ease all by himself.

He has still been struggling with picking things up; particularly his dry food, and over the last couple of days seems to have been finding it increasingly difficult to pick up his veggie strips too. He has also been hiding in his tunnel during meal times, so I've been coaxing him out. He'll have a sniff about before attempting to eat some bits but soon gives up again. His weight, consequently, has dropped down to 1.185kg, yesterday (as per his weekly weigh-in), and I've started up the syringe feeds again accordingly.

I had a look at his front teeth this morning and one of the top two is longer than the other, so not sure if that's behind it or if they trimmed them so far back last time he's still waiting from them to grow back in fully so they can be 100% operational and of use to him again. Any advice or experience gratefully received.

Needless to say, he is - of course - booked into see the vet first thing tomorrow morning, but - yeah - interested to hear from people far more experienced in the ways of guinea pig dentistry than me about what they think.
 

Wheekallweek

Teenage Guinea Pig
Joined
Apr 15, 2017
Messages
894
Likes
977
Points
525
Location
Staffordshire
#4
I really suggest going to Simon Maddock at Cat & Rabbit clinic in Northampton. He's the best when it comes to dental piggies. He does it GA free which is beneficial to piggies.
Definitely agree, we have a pig currently in the sanctuary called Duke who, if I’m honest, was on deaths door when we took him to see Kim at the Cat and Rabbit clinic. He’d lost 300g and was skin and bone, couldn’t eat by himself and was still loosing weight despite near constant syringe feeding. This was after a basic dental by our normal vets who aren’t specialists but tried their best. He was too poorly to go under another GA.

After ten minutes with Kim, general anaesthetic free, he came back into the consultation room munching on some spinach!
Although his teeth still aren’t 100% right, he’s maintaining his weight and eating well!

Honestly it’s 100% worth it; it was a long journey for us but Duke still goes back every month or so for a check up and I wouldn’t hesitate to go again with any pig.

A7E56695-FAA9-4746-9011-0855358D4642.jpeg
 

Stuart74

Junior Guinea Pig
Joined
Feb 4, 2019
Messages
18
Likes
13
Points
120
#5
Hello all. We've had our rescue piggie Bruce for about 18 months now, and he is four years old. Within three months of us coming to live with us, he started to suffer dental issues, which I posted about here. Our vet diagnosed overgrowth of the back molars, and he was treated promptly and made a full recovery. So much so, his weight rebounded to 1.3kg.

The problem, however, re-occurred recently (13 months exactly to the day), after we tracked a steady, not-quite-weekly- decline in his body weight, from 1.3kg to 1.238kg. So he underwent a GA and had his back teeth trimmed again, as well as his front incisors too (which he didn't last time). The vet diagnosed him with a mis-aligned jaw during the course of this procedure, which is what she thinks is behind his recurring dental issues.

In the immediate aftermath of the operation, he seemed to be bouncing back as before, but struggling a little bit with his newly-trimmed front teeth. We compensated by stepping in with syringe feeds and chopping his vegetables into long spaghetti type strips, which he seemed to find easier to deal with. We gradually scaled back the syringe feeds when we noticed he was maintaining his weight at around the 1.240kg with relative ease all by himself.

He has still been struggling with picking things up; particularly his dry food, and over the last couple of days seems to have been finding it increasingly difficult to pick up his veggie strips too. He has also been hiding in his tunnel during meal times, so I've been coaxing him out. He'll have a sniff about before attempting to eat some bits but soon gives up again. His weight, consequently, has dropped down to 1.185kg, yesterday (as per his weekly weigh-in), and I've started up the syringe feeds again accordingly.

I had a look at his front teeth this morning and one of the top two is longer than the other, so not sure if that's behind it or if they trimmed them so far back last time he's still waiting from them to grow back in fully so they can be 100% operational and of use to him again. Any advice or experience gratefully received.

Needless to say, he is - of course - booked into see the vet first thing tomorrow morning, but - yeah - interested to hear from people far more experienced in the ways of guinea pig dentistry than me about what they think.
Hope hes not got what my one had in maluccusion.?
My one had the same symptons of not eating and not interaction..
Syring fed him for a while but he passed away after being put down as his teeth was very bad and over grown in the molars...
Sorry dont mean to worry you but make sure the vet is a expert on dentistry
 

furryfriends (TEAS)

Forum Founder
Senior Guinea Pig
Joined
Jul 30, 2006
Messages
11,146
Likes
6,533
Points
1,875
Location
Director at TEAS (East Hunsbury) Northampton
#7
The only advice I can give is, go to Simon Maddock. I know he isn't local to you, but it will definitely be worth the trip and will save you money in the long run. We run a sanctuary for guinea pigs with ongoing dental issues and Simon is the reason that we exist, as we couldn't do what we do, without him. He's amazing!
 

Carrotyd

Junior Guinea Pig
Joined
Dec 3, 2014
Messages
208
Likes
443
Points
370
Location
Surrey
#8
I know just how highly Simon is thought of, which has to be a testament to his skill and expertise, and certainly would not rule out going to see him with Bruce in future, given his jaw alignment issues suggest his issues will reoccur.

In the meantime, our vet yesterday gave him a very thorough look over, and said the gums around his lower incisors are inflamed, which might be a source of some discomfort to him. He checked all around his jaw for lumps and bumps, to no avail, and said his teeth looked in good shape.

So he's given us a six-day course of metacam, and told us to come back early next week for another check-up. It has certainly perked Bruce up a bit, and he's eating far more hay on his own and with much more gusto than before he had the pain relief. So we shall see.
 
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