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Out of hours vet near Southampton? Out of hours fees!

Fluffbabies

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In preparation for our Ginger probably needing to be PTS soon due to her lymphoma/leukaemia, I've been calling round vets to know the costs. Our normal vet is fine and open quite late on weekdays and some time on the weekends which is great. I'm really hoping Ginger won't need an out of hours.

I live in Southampton and shockingly I've been quoted between £110-150 just to get in the door. They tried saying it was for a consultation and I told them she doesn't need one, if I bring her to an out of hours vet it's because she is suffering and needs to be PTS asap, not checked over first. They said that's what they charge just to see her. Then extra for PTS and more for cremation. I'm appalled, honestly. I knew it might be more expensive but I'm not looking for emergency treatment like if a dog got hit by a car. I just need some mercy to have her PTS if something goes horribly wrong at the wrong time. How can they charge that much extra! Where's the compassion for the animal. Now I know why our mum didn't want to take our dying dog to the vet on a Sunday (years and years ago) even though it was suffering!

Does anyone know an out of hours vet in/near Southampton that doesn't have such an insane fee just to have PTS?
 

Siikibam

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I think emergency vets generally charge around that, simply because of the time they’re available. I don’t know that you will find anywhere cheaper, even if you’re putting piggy to sleep . When going to an out-of-hours you usually ring your vet and use the one they give details for. Sorry that’s not much help but I don’t want you to find the same everywhere and be disappointed.

Perhaps use google as I think most use the emergency vet that’s given by their normal hours vets.
 

furryfriends (TEAS)

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I’ve been quoted up to £170, just for the privilege of walking through their door, with a consult price on top of that. I think when you start to see a decline, it’ll be slow enough for you to wait to see a vet during normal opening hours x
 

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I am so sorry you find yourself in this situation, however that does sound like fairly standard out of hours/emergency fees.

However what I would say is that having lost a guinea pig to lymphoma it is highly unlikely to end as an emergency.
You will see a slow deterioration over time and this will allow you to plan (if that doesn't sound too calculated).
When Oreo was sick we decided that it was better to let her go too soon, but in a calm way that allowed the family to prepare.
Oreo belonged to my teenage daughter so this was very important to me.

We knew she wasn't going to get better, so letting her go before she started to suffer and making sure it ended as calmly as possible at a vet who was familiar with Oreo and our family really did seem like the best option.

of course you should only do what is right for you and your family - this was just my experience.
 

Fluffbabies

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Yeh I'm going to keep looking after I finish work tonight as they're all closed now. Surprisingly there only seem to be a couple even though I'm in a city.

With the £110-150 to get in the door, then £40-50 for PTS plus cremation... I'd be looking at over £200! Our normal vet is £39 for PTS and £12.50 for cremation, no extra cost to be seen.

I guess if she shows signs of deterioration and it's looking like it might end up being out of hours, we'll have to think about 'better a day too soon than a day too late'.

Of course we don't know how she'll end up passing :( I guess it's whether she deteriorates and we can help her pass gently, she suddenly starts passing in a horrible way and we rush her to be PTS or she passes without showing signs for us to notice during the night or when we're at work and we find her. :/
 

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I’m sorry you’re in this situation. Try to make every day happy. That’s what they work on. I think when the time comes you will know. Lots of hugs.
 

Fluffbabies

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I’ve been quoted up to £170, just for the privilege of walking through their door, with a consult price on top of that. I think when you start to see a decline, it’ll be slow enough for you to wait to see a vet during normal opening hours x

I hope so. I think that would be the "nicest" way if she has chance to let us know she's not enjoying life anymore. We can take a moment to breathe and help her pass peacefully. My boyfriend is always scared when he wakes up or comes home from work that he's going to find her (or any of them) dead in the cage. So I try to go in first if I'm here as I've been through this a lot growing up with many animals.

Even though they're all 4, I never expected to suddenly go from we've got time to this is happening in days whether you like it or not. :'( But I am thankful we have had some warning with her even though seeing all the lumps grow on her is horrible. She's got a huge one on her side now. We weren't sure if it's a lump or fluid build up. Simon said she might get edema and fluid build up and we could give her diuretics but I'm not sure there is much point trying to extend her time by a couple of days. I think we'll just treat her with the metacam and if she goes off food we might try coaxing her with some syringe food if she still seems interested in living. But I expect it wouldn't be long after she goes off her food that she declines in other ways.
 

Fluffbabies

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I am so sorry you find yourself in this situation, however that does sound like fairly standard out of hours/emergency fees.

However what I would say is that having lost a guinea pig to lymphoma it is highly unlikely to end as an emergency.
You will see a slow deterioration over time and this will allow you to plan (if that doesn't sound too calculated).
When Oreo was sick we decided that it was better to let her go too soon, but in a calm way that allowed the family to prepare.
Oreo belonged to my teenage daughter so this was very important to me.

We knew she wasn't going to get better, so letting her go before she started to suffer and making sure it ended as calmly as possible at a vet who was familiar with Oreo and our family really did seem like the best option.

of course you should only do what is right for you and your family - this was just my experience.

Thank you for your reassurance that it will hopefully be a slow deterioration. This is how we're feeling as well. When she withdraws from eating, moving around and interacting with the others we'll plan our pts trip to the vet. We are lucky we have PetsAtHome so they're open weekends too and we would likely be able to make it to when they are open. It's so hard knowing she won't get better but I guess it saves us (and more importantly her) from vets trips, examinations and treatments trying to find what is wrong.

One of our others, Leia, has a lump on her face which Simon thinks is some kind of tumour. It is deep set and hard to operate on. We sent the sample off to get more answers but he suggested to just let her live with it as surgery may do more harm than good when she's perfectly happy with it. We can't know a prognosis but it looks like we're just going to let it run it's course. She's on metacam as well, just in case it's causing her any discomfort, although Simon didn't think it was.
 

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BIG HUG

That is unfortunately the standard price for an after hours consultation. Please keep in mind that it is very expensive to run out-of-hours emergency services - they still need to rent premises, have medical stocks and need to pay higher shift wages for comparatively few consultations - unless it's a bank holiday or especially Christmas with all the chocolate, raisin etc. emergencies when they are usually hopeless snowed under. Nevertheless having mandatory out-of-hours vet cover available in the UK in an absolute emergency rather than having to sit for our hours with a piggy grunting or writhing in pain is a valued privilege for those extreme cases.

Unless a piggy of mine is absolute agony (like grunting with pain or retchingfrom concrete like belly in a fast developing, sudden onset severe bloat/blockage or twisted gut or twisting in pain, or a bad accident/bad bleeding) or needs to be seen asap to be in with a chance of survival (being totally flat from GI stasis, acute heart failure or heat stroke, bad fitting or an old piggy having fallen onto their back and being unable to right themselves for too long, which can be too much of a strain for the heart etc.), I always try to hang in there until the morning but I make sure that I do have an out-of-hours consultation fee in my vet fund at all times. It does unfortunately happen that you need to make use of them.

As to cremation: some vets charge a premium for referring piggies to a pet crematorium. If you are within reach of one, going there directly will make it a lot cheaper. It is something worth researching.

In your specific case, you are rather unlikely to need out of hours services because the deterioration is not as quick as a matter of just a few hours. You will know the day when the pain becomes greater than the will to live and can arrange something during daytime hours. Your treating vet will generally do their best to try to squeeze in a piggy with a diagnosed terminal illness coming to the end of their life. ;)

The information in these guides here may help you make any necessary assessments:
List Of Life And Death Out-of-hours Emergencies
Emergency, Crisis and Bridging Care until a Vet Appointment
A Practical and Sensitive Guide to Dying, Terminal Illness and Euthanasia in Guinea Pigs

All the best for your poorly piggy; I hope that she still have some happy days or weeks to come!
 

Fluffbabies

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BIG HUG

That is unfortunately the standard price for an after hours consultation. Please keep in mind that it is very expensive to run out-of-hours emergency services - they still need to rent premises, have medical stocks and need to pay higher shift wages for comparatively few consultations - unless it's a bank holiday or especially Christmas with all the chocolate, raisin etc. emergencies when they are usually hopeless snowed under. Nevertheless having mandatory out-of-hours vet cover available in the UK in an absolute emergency rather than having to sit for our hours with a piggy grunting or writhing in pain is a valued privilege for those extreme cases.

Unless a piggy of mine is absolute agony (like grunting with pain or retchingfrom concrete like belly in a fast developing, sudden onset severe bloat/blockage or twisted gut or twisting in pain, or a bad accident/bad bleeding) or needs to be seen asap to be in with a chance of survival (being totally flat from GI stasis, acute heart failure or heat stroke, bad fitting or an old piggy having fallen onto their back and being unable to right themselves for too long, which can be too much of a strain for the heart etc.), I always try to hang in there until the morning but I make sure that I do have an out-of-hours consultation fee in my vet fund at all times. It does unfortunately happen that you need to make use of them.

As to cremation: some vets charge a premium for referring piggies to a pet crematorium. If you are within reach of one, going there directly will make it a lot cheaper. It is something worth researching.

In your specific case, you are rather unlikely to need out of hours services because the deterioration is not as quick as a matter of just a few hours. You will know the day when the pain becomes greater than the will to live and can arrange something during daytime hours. Your treating vet will generally do their best to try to squeeze in a piggy with a diagnosed terminal illness coming to the end of their life. ;)

The information in these guides here may help you make any necessary assessments:
List Of Life And Death Out-of-hours Emergencies
Emergency, Crisis and Bridging Care until a Vet Appointment
A Practical and Sensitive Guide to Dying, Terminal Illness and Euthanasia in Guinea Pigs

All the best for your poorly piggy; I hope that she still have some happy days or weeks to come!

Thank you Wiebke, I have talked to my treating vet already about our plans and they are very nice. They said also it isn't a problem for us to bring Ginger back home so the girls can see her and say their goodbyes, and then take her back to them to be cremated. Although they (the receptionist at least) hadn't heard of someone doing that before. I would rather do that so the others understand and don't look and pine for her. When we had one of our cats put down, his sister looked and pined for him for months. She spent the best part of a year grieving for him. They didn't even seem to be that close (siblings eh!) but they obviously loved each other dearly. And his passing meant she was left by herself with Ollie the dog who is keen to be friends with her but she really isn't fond of him! Poor Ollie! lol

Our treating vet also has decent costs. We have an emergency fund for the piggies and we would pay it if we needed to. Especially as we were expecting a £300 operation for both Ginger and Leia, plus consultation, medication, test and aftercare costs. I was bracing myself for £700ish from Wednesday's vet visit. All in all we're at about £400 something. But it doesn't matter. You pay it for your furries.

After Ginger's two abscess removal at just 8 months old which cost us about £400 with medications etc as well (we weren't expecting that at that age but now we've learned that lesson!), we have always called her a Gucci pig because she's expensive. Another nickname for her. We joked about her costing so much money for a young guinea pig. Now that we have spent quite a bit on Leia at the vets we've said she's Prada. We joke that Oreo is L'Oreal because she's worth it, her long glossy hair and that she hasn't cost much.. yet. We haven't got one for Nugget yet.
 

Fluffbabies

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The nicknames are light-hearted just so everyone knows! They all have their own list of nicknames :) We don't mind spending the money on them but we do joke that they could get jobs to help us out :D
 

Wiebke

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Thank you Wiebke, I have talked to my treating vet already about our plans and they are very nice. They said also it isn't a problem for us to bring Ginger back home so the girls can see her and say their goodbyes, and then take her back to them to be cremated. Although they (the receptionist at least) hadn't heard of someone doing that before. I would rather do that so the others understand and don't look and pine for her. When we had one of our cats put down, his sister looked and pined for him for months. She spent the best part of a year grieving for him. They didn't even seem to be that close (siblings eh!) but they obviously loved each other dearly. And his passing meant she was left by herself with Ollie the dog who is keen to be friends with her but she really isn't fond of him! Poor Ollie! lol

Our treating vet also has decent costs. We have an emergency fund for the piggies and we would pay it if we needed to. Especially as we were expecting a £300 operation for both Ginger and Leia, plus consultation, medication, test and aftercare costs. I was bracing myself for £700ish from Wednesday's vet visit. All in all we're at about £400 something. But it doesn't matter. You pay it for your furries.

After Ginger's two abscess removal at just 8 months old which cost us about £400 with medications etc as well (we weren't expecting that at that age but now we've learned that lesson!), we have always called her a Gucci pig because she's expensive. Another nickname for her. We joked about her costing so much money for a young guinea pig. Now that we have spent quite a bit on Leia at the vets we've said she's Prada. We joke that Oreo is L'Oreal because she's worth it, her long glossy hair and that she hasn't cost much.. yet. We haven't got one for Nugget yet.

I hope that you (and other people reading this this thread) will find the information helpful.

Anyway, I am also bracing for a very expensive vet trip on Monday when I have a booked a several slots consultation block for some piggies with issues that are not urgent but need to be checked as a couple may require an operation at our piggy savvy vet's a distance away, now that they are back from their holiday and the first rush for appointments is over. :(

Please keep in mind that Ginger's mates are well aware that she is ill. When that becomes critical, the very ill will usually remove themselves from the group and say their goodbyes then - as much as this is possible in a cage setting, either by holing up in a hut/cosy or a cage corner a distance away from the others who may drop by shortly during that time to take their leave or even spend some time lying next to them in moral support (this is often an indicator for me that a gradually declining piggy is coming near to their end, actually). In this case you will find that there won't be any interest in seeing the body because the necessary has already happened.
Giving a time to say goodbye is more crucial when the decision to pts is an unexpected one and the goodbye has not happened or a suddenly ill piggy has passed away in your arms outside the cage.
 

Fluffbabies

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I hope that you (and other people reading this this thread) will find the information helpful.

Anyway, I am also bracing for a very expensive vet trip on Monday when I have a booked a several slots consultation block for some piggies with issues that are not urgent but need to be checked as a couple may require an operation at our piggy savvy vet's a distance away, now that they are back from their holiday and the first rush for appointments is over. :(

Please keep in mind that Ginger's mates are well aware that she is ill. When that becomes critical, the very ill will usually remove themselves from the group and say their goodbyes then - as much as this is possible in a cage setting, either by holing up in a hut/cosy or a cage corner a distance away from the others who may drop by shortly during that time to take their leave or even spend some time lying next to them in moral support (this is often an indicator for me that a gradually declining piggy is coming near to their end, actually). In this case you will find that there won't be any interest in seeing the body because the necessary has already happened.
Giving a time to say goodbye is more crucial when the decision to pts is an unexpected one and the goodbye has not happened or a suddenly ill piggy has passed away in your arms outside the cage.

Thanks for that information. I didn't know that. So if it looks like they've said their goodbyes and she's withdrawn by herself then I won't bring her body back for them to see.

It did confuse me that people say Ginger doesn't know she's ill... I guess what they mean is she doesn't know how ill she is or that she's terminal? And that piggies live in the moment so until it bothers her and she deteriorates she's going to continue to be happy and do her piggy things. She certainly knows she has lumps. That's how we found the first one because when my boyfriend stroked her neck, she bit him and ours never bite. He took it as a sign something was wrong, had a feel and found it. Funnily enough after I'd had a feel too, when we put her back in the cage, she popcorned quite a bit! Almost like she was happy we knew.

The other piggies definitely know that she's ill. The others have been guarding her and sleeping next to her a lot. Normally as top boss piggy she doesn't always allow this so we found it worrying. They also guarded Leia with the lump on her face. We saw it when they were on the sofa with us. We went to feel it and two of the others went either side of her in our way then licked her face. They haven't done recently so we're hoping Leia still has a long time with us. It has made us more aware that any day could be their day no matter their age.

I hope your vet trip goes as well as it can and I'll keep your piggies in my thoughts. We certainly give that vets very busy!
 

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Thanks for that information. I didn't know that. So if it looks like they've said their goodbyes and she's withdrawn by herself then I won't bring her body back for them to see.

It did confuse me that people say Ginger doesn't know she's ill... I guess what they mean is she doesn't know how ill she is or that she's terminal? And that piggies live in the moment so until it bothers her and she deteriorates she's going to continue to be happy and do her piggy things. She certainly knows she has lumps. That's how we found the first one because when my boyfriend stroked her neck, she bit him and ours never bite. He took it as a sign something was wrong, had a feel and found it. Funnily enough after I'd had a feel too, when we put her back in the cage, she popcorned quite a bit! Almost like she was happy we knew.

The other piggies definitely know that she's ill. The others have been guarding her and sleeping next to her a lot. Normally as top boss piggy she doesn't always allow this so we found it worrying. They also guarded Leia with the lump on her face. We saw it when they were on the sofa with us. We went to feel it and two of the others went either side of her in our way then licked her face. They haven't done recently so we're hoping Leia still has a long time with us. It has made us more aware that any day could be their day no matter their age.

I hope your vet trip goes as well as it can and I'll keep your piggies in my thoughts. We certainly give that vets very busy!

She will know at some point that she is not right and then increasingly that she is not well, and her companions will pick up on it, too, at some point. Peer support is more easily noticeable when the problem is very localised and visible. Saliva contains antibiotic compounds, so licking is a way of naturally medicating a friend with a surface problem; it also comes into play in piggy washes when piggies are gradually spreading their saliva all over their body. That is frequent bathing can actually cause more skin problems than it prevents.

Licking behaviour in a specific spot has occasionally alerted me to a hay poke that had not yet ulcerated or another localised issue.

You can never control when and what from a pet of yours, especially a small one dies. It is best to do it the piggy way and treasure every new day with them as the gift it is instead of fixating on a long life span and THE END - death comes ALWAYS far too soon and by staring at it, you waste too much precious time and emotions on something that is out of your control, that will happen anyway and that you will have to deal with in its own time irrespective of your own attitude. The more you fixate on it, the less likely you are to cope well because you taint or altogether neglect to create all the precious memories that will stay in your heart and that are the fire you can warm your metaphorical hands at when times are tough, you feel lonely and forgotten - those happy memories are still there for you in your darkest hours if you can remember to look. We still carry all our loved ones with us as long as we can remember.

What Ginger is unaware of is the fact that she is suffering from a terminal illness. Like most animals, she is wired to keep going for as long as possible and suppress symptoms as long as she can. ;)
 
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