Should Hedgehogs And Sugar Gliders Be Legal?

Should hedge hogs and sugar gliders be illegal in the suburbs?

  • Yes both

    Votes: 1 16.7%
  • No both

    Votes: 1 16.7%
  • Hedge hog yes, sugar glider no

    Votes: 1 16.7%
  • Sugar glider yes, hedgehog no

    Votes: 3 50.0%
  • I don't know

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    6
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CreamCheese

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In my state you can get a licens for every single animal but two-sugar gliders and hedge hogs (I live in the suburbs). You can have a friggin' lion, but not a hedgehog or sugar glider. This is because they are an invasive species, and if they were to escape they could cause serious harm to the envirment, but my science teacher has a bernies python and they are an invasive species too, so I don't understand this reasoning. I was really looking into adopting a sugar glider and I'm very upset that they are illegal. That being said, should they be illegal in my state? Keep in mind I live in the suburbs.
I'm going to try an attach a poll, but I'm not 100% sure how too, so if I don't just comment your opinion.
 

MrsMoo

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I'm guessing you're not in the Uk. As far as I'm aware sugar gliders and african pigmy hedgehogs can be kept as pets in the Uk. What sort of hedgehog do you mean? I know the British/European hedgehog is protected wildlife and can't be kept as a pet.
 

Guineapigfeet

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I don't think sugar gliders should be kept as pets - it makes me sad. They are nocturnal and we are not and they need to be able to glide (it's in the name!) and jump about in the tops of trees. I don't think we can offer, in a domestic situation, a natural enough life for them
 

MrsMoo

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I don't think sugar gliders should be kept as pets - it makes me sad. They are nocturnal and we are not and they need to be able to glide (it's in the name!) and jump about in the tops of trees. I don't think we can offer, in a domestic situation, a natural enough life for them
:agr: I researched them a while back and if they are kept as pets they require a large 'aviary' for them to live in.
 

CreamCheese

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I'm guessing you're not in the Uk. As far as I'm aware sugar gliders and african pigmy hedgehogs can be kept as pets in the Uk. What sort of hedgehog do you mean? I know the British/European hedgehog is protected wildlife and can't be kept as a pet.
No I don't, I actually live in America. I really don't know what kind of hedge hog, I was just thinking hedge hogs in general. I haven't done a lot of reasearch on the different breeds :/
 

CreamCheese

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I don't think sugar gliders should be kept as pets - it makes me sad. They are nocturnal and we are not and they need to be able to glide (it's in the name!) and jump about in the tops of trees. I don't think we can offer, in a domestic situation, a natural enough life for them
I understand that reasoning. But of course you would need a licens to buy one, it wouldn't be like a guineapig were anyone can buy one. It would require a state issued licens, so who ever issued this licens would make sure that it is in a very large and proper sized cage. Would you agree in those case?
 

Guineapigfeet

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If it's kept in a natural environment i.e a massive aviary with trees that can be kept at the right temperature, then OK, but I still don't get the desire to own a nocturnal animal and don't like the though of having wild animals as pets (even if they're captive bred) . I know all domestic animals started of as wild species originally but it makes me feel a bit . . . guilty I suppose!
 

CreamCheese

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If it's kept in a natural environment i.e a massive aviary with trees that can be kept at the right temperature, then OK, but I still don't get the desire to own a nocturnal animal and don't like the though of having wild animals as pets (even if they're captive bred) . I know all domestic animals started of as wild species originally but it makes me feel a bit . . . guilty I suppose!
I understand that reasoning completely:)
 

Falken

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It's a tricky one, the emphasis today is the preservation of native wildlife, anything that may out-compete it should perhaps be banned. In the UK hedgehogs are rather an endangered species, so we'd love a few more. Exotic animals permits have, in recent times become rather controversial, as has the profusion of those animals into the local ecosystem (Florida and pythons in particular). As these policies tend not to have too much political capital (and therefore no incentive for political interference), I guess that whatever your state has decided has been based solely on the conclusions of local scientists, so the ban should probably stand.
 

Guineapigfeet

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They are (admittedly) adorable. Tiny cute flying squirrels essentially. Except they eat nectar like an insect
 

CreamCheese

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It's a tricky one, the emphasis today is the preservation of native wildlife, anything that may out-compete it should perhaps be banned. In the UK hedgehogs are rather an endangered species, so we'd love a few more. Exotic animals permits have, in recent times become rather controversial, as has the profusion of those animals into the local ecosystem (Florida and pythons in particular). As these policies tend not to have too much political capital (and therefore no incentive for political interference), I guess that whatever your state has decided has been based solely on the conclusions of local scientists, so the ban should probably stand.
I have tried contacting the person who made this law to understand their reasoning in more detail. I had e-mailed them about this topic and he said, "I will be sure to get back to you asap" but he never contacted me after that, which makes me a bit skeptical if he has good reasoning, unfortunately I'll probably never know :/
 
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