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What has Jacques got?

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Michele

Wondering if anyone can tell me what Jacques has got? I have an idea but not 100%

They have both been outside this evening and when I took Jacques back to the garage into her hutch I noticed something on her fur. Jacques is a white piggy is its pretty easy to see. Around her back end area and underneath going up the belly she has brown tiny speaks that are about millimetre to 2 millemetre long. Loads of it.

Now Freddie last year had mites but only noticed due to her having a scab in the middle of her back (she's the brown one). Is this mites or lice? I'm taking them botht to the vets tomorrow morning to find out but just interested on your views. I have also noticed that when I going and see them both she always has 2 tuffs of fur that is out of place on one side.

I have also notice which i'm not sure is normal. They both had cream stuff on their vagina. not greatly concern about that as they both have it.

Michele
 
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Are you sure she's not picked up any dirt from outside? But could well be lice.

Discharge on their vagina might be normal especially when they come into 'season'. Only sometimes do my girls have a little bit of discharge. It's nothing to worry about.
 
M

Michele

My girls dont come into season they have had full hysterectomies.

I tried wiping it off but it didnt come off. Also as you know I dnt want to bath her as she's never had one and I dont want to cause a heartattack. if i can get a photo of it i will try.

Michele
 
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OK. Does she squeak when she goes to the loo then? Could be a sign of cystitis? I've never had a piggy with this so not really sure what to look for?

A photo would be good if you can get one.
 
M

Michele

just had a look again.

If i found it on my cat i would say it was flea dirt. You know what i mean. she doesnt squeak when she pees.

Will try taking a photo as soon as hubby is back from petrol station but i think it mightbe too small
 
M

Michele

I tried taking a photo but you cant see it. its like flea dirt though. no worries i will see what the vets say tomorrow
 

Lucinda

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Can't really help, Michele. Probably bugs of some kind.

As for vaginal discharge, mine have all had it and I think it's quite normal, probably even with hysterectomies.
 
M

Michele

Was reading my piggy books last night in bed and I think its hay mites or they also call it static lice. Off to the vets this morning.
 
M

Michele

Just got back. Jacques has definitely got lice. Vet had a look under the microscope. So NO injections. Vet gave me Frontline spray to use and I now need to re clean the hutch even though i only done it Saturday.
 
K

KatsCavies

Yep, it definately sounds like static.

Here's the info from guinea-piglopaedia

Hay Mites
Tiny mites that live off dandruff, grease and skin debris. They are located in the coat, mainly on the rump.
Although not a variety of louse, these mites are commonly known under the name 'static lice', as opposed to 'running lice'. The scientific name is Chirodiscoides cavia. A single hay mite is hardly visible to the naked eye, but in the case of heavier infestation where they are found in abundance, they are easily seen, especially on the rump. The colour is greyish and thus more visible in dark and white pig, where they can completely destroy the overall appearance. They tend to sit on the mid-section of the hair straw, and, unless looked at very closely for some time, they do not appear to move.
There is some dispute about where hay mites come from. Some claim that they come from hay (hence the name), while others regard them as specific guinea pig parasites and claim they should be treated as such. They are not intrusive and live on hair straws with only little contact with the skin, the vast majority of pigs are unaffected by the presense of hay mites.
Treatment is quite difficult. Hay mites are not susceptible to many of the common antiparasitic preparations, and resistance develops readily. However, it is possible to reduce the numbers considerably, especially if a combination of preparations is used. This may lead to over-dosage, as one preparation may potentiate the effect of the other and it is important to consider whether the cure is worse than the disease.
However, one health problem may occur. Some pigs seem to become sensitised to mites such as dust mites and hay mites, and become pruritic. Such pigs must be kept as free from dust and static lice as possible, and glucocorticoid treatments may sometimes prove useful.


Kat
 
M

Michele

KatsCavies said:
Yep, it definately sounds like static.

Here's the info from guinea-piglopaedia

Hay Mites
Tiny mites that live off dandruff, grease and skin debris. They are located in the coat, mainly on the rump.
Although not a variety of louse, these mites are commonly known under the name 'static lice', as opposed to 'running lice'. The scientific name is Chirodiscoides cavia. A single hay mite is hardly visible to the naked eye, but in the case of heavier infestation where they are found in abundance, they are easily seen, especially on the rump. The colour is greyish and thus more visible in dark and white pig, where they can completely destroy the overall appearance. They tend to sit on the mid-section of the hair straw, and, unless looked at very closely for some time, they do not appear to move.
There is some dispute about where hay mites come from. Some claim that they come from hay (hence the name), while others regard them as specific guinea pig parasites and claim they should be treated as such. They are not intrusive and live on hair straws with only little contact with the skin, the vast majority of pigs are unaffected by the presense of hay mites.
Treatment is quite difficult. Hay mites are not susceptible to many of the common antiparasitic preparations, and resistance develops readily. However, it is possible to reduce the numbers considerably, especially if a combination of preparations is used. This may lead to over-dosage, as one preparation may potentiate the effect of the other and it is important to consider whether the cure is worse than the disease.
However, one health problem may occur. Some pigs seem to become sensitised to mites such as dust mites and hay mites, and become pruritic. Such pigs must be kept as free from dust and static lice as possible, and glucocorticoid treatments may sometimes prove useful.


Kat

Thats what i saw last night. Love that book. its got everything you need to know.

Mine definitely got lice. I asked if they got it from hay and she said that it was probably cos of the weather and that the ones that guinea pigs normally have just decided to get infested. But i went home and re cleaned the hutch and washed the vetbeds and threw out the hay too.
 

starshine

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Sorry I didn't see this earlier!

I would have said Lice straight away! There is so much about at the moment.

Hope Jacques is better soon - what are you treating her with?
 
M

Michele

Frontline Spray. If it hasnt cleared in a month then i need to do it again.
 
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