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COVID-19 BBC article about anti-vaxxers, ethnic minorities, and attitudes towards a vaccine

Bill & Ted

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I'm really heartened at all the considered responses here.
For perspective, I'm probably somewhere on the spectrum, I did have MMR, but delayed, my cousin didn't, my aunt believed the reporting at the time and decided not to, he developed measles on a trip to Germany when he was around 13, he was very ill but recovered. At 20 he developed testicular cancer and recovered with the loss of the offending item, when he was 25 he got it in the other, he ended up in the Lancet - and the prevailing theory was that it was a complication due to the measles. There's been a concerted attack on science for a long time now, and I urge that those of us that still have the capacity to understand basic logic fight to defend it, against the graduates of YouTube and Facebook College, Moron University.
You forgot flat earthers! :D
 

Lady Kelly

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I think I will pay for the flu vaccine this year. Got it free last year on account of being pregnant and as I am definitely not doing that again any time soon I won't qualify this year
 

Bill & Ted

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I think I will pay for the flu vaccine this year. Got it free last year on account of being pregnant and as I am definitely not doing that again any time soon I won't qualify this year
It’s worth every penny! Flu is ghastly 🤧
 

Falken

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I think I will pay for the flu vaccine this year. Got it free last year on account of being pregnant and as I am definitely not doing that again any time soon I won't qualify this year
It's wise, flu takes so many lives a year, every GP surgery gets a glut of doses for vulnerable groups, but there's still such stubbornness to take it, the majority are usually thrown away.
 

Falken

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:) Another thing they tend to do is state that these three are normal childhood illnesses that just work themselves out, but they're all serious, they all have serious consequences - mumps and measles often lead to sepsis and brain damage. Chickenpox is usually unpleasant, but relatively mild in children - but not adults. Then there are the older diseases that most of us will have never had to deal with, TB, which kills in a similar way to COVID, it's a horrible disease that was thought to be eradicated here, and if you read enough history, most of your favorite historical characters will have died of 'consumption'. My grandmother, as a young adult back in the 50s worked at an 'isolation hospital' - which was a Victorian invention, built in the middle of nowhere, originally for TB cases, the idea was that open verandas, lots of airing and plenty of light would help improve the situation, in her day the majority of patients were children, with things like scarlet fever and polio (Lord Nuffield hadn't come up with the cheap ones at that time, so it was usually death or lifelong disability), often they didn't make it, and the only company they had were the other children and the nurses - they tried to remove them at night so as not to disturb the other children. Then there's tetanus, which we are all vaccinated against, it leads to a horrible death through total muscle paralysis, imagine being unable to breath or swallow or talk or blink.

All of these things have ceased to be a common concern as we've managed to vaccinate against them over the years (we wouldn't have made the effort if they weren't major issues).
 

piggieminder

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I was horrified when I heard they had stopped the TB vaccination, I know it had gone from this country but with global travel it was not going to be long before it came back. I'm old enough to have known people who had lost loved ones to it, most families lost someone. The isolation hospital was still there (derelict) when I was a child.
My son had measles from the vaccine (old style), the Dr told me to imagine how ill he would have been if he'd had full blown measles. That was bad enough I couldn't bear to think of the consequences if he'd not been vaccinated.
I had mild whooping cough in my 20s despite being vaccinated as a child, I wouldn't want a bad dose of that.
I'm old enough to have seen the results of polio, adults who were disabled were given little blue cars. One of my teachers was disabled due to polio.
The girl who would have been my aunt, my dads sister died aged 15 from scarlet fever.
We had chicken pox party's when I was a child, no vaccine then. If one child got it all their friends were invited round to play in the hope they would get it too, it was thought to be better to get immunity while young. I've still got the scars.
I won't bore you with any more I could write a book!
If I'm offered the flu vaccine I will take it, although I'm not sure how our surgery will deliver, they are still hiding behind their desks and you can't vaccinate down the phone, not yet anyway!
 

anyar.dris

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Anyone migrating to the UK needs to submit a TB test certificate stating you don't have TB or had done successful treatment of TB, if you are coming from outside the EU and America (I think also not from Australia and New Zealand, there is a list in the gov website). This is one requirement needed to be submitted when applying for a visa (except visit visa).
 

Falken

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Anyone migrating to the UK needs to submit a TB test certificate stating you don't have TB or had done successful treatment of TB, if you are coming from outside the EU and America (I think also not from Australia and New Zealand, there is a list in the gov website). This is one requirement needed to be submitted when applying for a visa (except visit visa).
With TB it's probably re-entered from within the east - it's been an issue for a few years now, and it's now anti-biotic resistant (which is another story entirely, people seriously need to learn how they actually work), it's been spotted in our substance using community, but far from blaming them - as we did with other disenfranchised people at the start of HIV/AIDS, we should treat them as the canary in the coal mine, and take action while we still have the luxury of time.
 

Tigermoth

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The TB vaccine programme has changed but is still there to an extent. In some areas all newborns are given a bcg before going home from hospital. In other areas the baby is vaccinated depending on risk, so if the family come from, intend to travel to, or have visitors from, a country that has a high incidence of tb. A high incidence being defined as more than 40 cases per 10000 head of population.
 

PigglePuggle

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I believe part of the scientific argument against the bcg jab is that it is only 80% effective but anyone who has had it would subsequently always test positive in a blood test for TB exposure? I had the bcg jab and so did piggy daddy, its the one vaccination his parents consented to as they lived on a farm with rescue badgers (though whether it would protect against bovine TB is open to debate...) but my daughter's generation (millenials!) didnt get bcg in the UK and I dont think the USA offer it at all, though they do routinely vaccinate against chickenpox there...
 

piggieminder

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It's interesting how times change. In the old days bcg was done at regular intervals (10 years?) it left a nasty scar. Both my grandmother's had very scarred arms. I had it once on the sole of my foot so that the scar doesn't show (thanks Mum). My children all had it they are in their 30s but it was a different type of needle that only left a small mark.
 

PigglePuggle

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It's interesting how times change. In the old days bcg was done at regular intervals (10 years?) it left a nasty scar. Both my grandmother's had very scarred arms. I had it once on the sole of my foot so that the scar doesn't show (thanks Mum). My children all had it they are in their 30s but it was a different type of needle that only left a small mark.
Yes mine is a very small scar but piggy daddy's bcg scar looks like a moon crater!
 

Tigermoth

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It's interesting how times change. In the old days bcg was done at regular intervals (10 years?) it left a nasty scar. Both my grandmother's had very scarred arms. I had it once on the sole of my foot so that the scar doesn't show (thanks Mum). My children all had it they are in their 30s but it was a different type of needle that only left a small mark.
The scar is nothing to do with the needle. It’s an “intradermal” injection, so it is given between layers of the skin. It’s phenomenally difficult to do, especially on a wriggly baby! The scar is down to the reaction caused by the vaccine. So the scar is to do with the individual reaction, or because it was given either too deeply and under the skin rather than between the layers or not deep enough and it oozed out. i have no scar at all. It’s a pita as every time I change jobs it comes up as a problem.
 

piggieminder

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The scar is nothing to do with the needle. It’s an “intradermal” injection, so it is given between layers of the skin. It’s phenomenally difficult to do, especially on a wriggly baby! The scar is down to the reaction caused by the vaccine. So the scar is to do with the individual reaction, or because it was given either too deeply and under the skin rather than between the layers or not deep enough and it oozed out. i have no scar at all. It’s a pita as every time I change jobs it comes up as a problem.
My understanding of it was that years ago when my grandmother's were children/young adults the vaccine was administered in a different way with a very large multi pronged (for want of a better word!) needle. They would both be 120 plus now if they were alive.
 

Lorcan

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I've had the BCG (I'm 33 this December, so 20ish years ago) along with MMR, polio, and whatever other ones they gave us in school. Never had any since apart from the flu jab, though. I'd have taken an injection over those damn polio drops any day.
 

Tigermoth

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My understanding of it was that years ago when my grandmother's were children/young adults the vaccine was administered in a different way with a very large multi pronged (for want of a better word!) needle. They would both be 120 plus now if they were alive.
That sounds more like the antibody test, was called the “6 needles” when I was a kid! Now it’s the less scary sounding “mantoux test” with one needle.
 
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