Change in behaviour

Trufsandash

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Looking for some advice please. We have a 5 month old boar who lost his partner just over a month ago. When they were small, he was so trusting. He allowed us to hold him for about an hour at a time and would happily stretch out and close his eyes on our laps. Since he lost his brother, he has become more skittish. He is very confident in his cage and comes out for floor time daily and will allow us to stroke him while he eats. He will even climb onto my lap if I have food but will jump off again the minute I try to touch him and when we hold him he will not sit still and is constantly scrabbling to get down! How do we get back to that gentle sleeping pig who used to love cuddles on our laps?
 

Swissgreys

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Welcome to the Forum
:wel:

Company of their own kind really is vital for having a happy and confident guinea pig.
I am sorry you lost his brother and it sounds like he does still love and trust you, but it also sounds like he would appreciate a friend of his own kind.
Maybe some boar dating to allow him to choose a new friend when you all feel ready?
 

Wiebke

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Looking for some advice please. We have a 5 month old boar who lost his partner just over a month ago. When they were small, he was so trusting. He allowed us to hold him for about an hour at a time and would happily stretch out and close his eyes on our laps. Since he lost his brother, he has become more skittish. He is very confident in his cage and comes out for floor time daily and will allow us to stroke him while he eats. He will even climb onto my lap if I have food but will jump off again the minute I try to touch him and when we hold him he will not sit still and is constantly scrabbling to get down! How do we get back to that gentle sleeping pig who used to love cuddles on our laps?
Hi and welcome

I am very sorry about your loss.
You can find helpful information and resources for yourself in this guide here: Human Bereavement: Grieving, Coping and Support Links for Guinea Pig Owners and Their Children

Guinea pigs are group animals that rely heavily on constant interaction and stimulation from their own kind. Guinea pig social interaction is much more complex than even researchers expected. The best and most loving ever present you can make him is a mate to make him happy again. Please keep in mind that the average healthy life span is 5-7 years. That is a very long time to spend all on their own...
Also accept that by default you are now at the receiving end of all his social needs.
However, since your boy is now a teenager coming up to the time when a life time high of testosterone is buzzing through his body, it is unlikely that you will get your little baby back; it is now growing up fast!
Looking After a Bereaved Guinea Pig
Single Guinea Pigs - Challenges and Responsibilities

Human-cavy interaction with respecting guinea pig social interactive body language and social concepts:
Understanding Prey Animal Instincts, Guinea Pig Whispering And Cuddling Tips
Who is the boss - your guinea pig or you?

Please take the time to read the comprehensive information in our boar guide. It contains a chapter on the different ages (including teenage) and what that means for boars as well as how to best go about companionship for single/bereaved boars.
A Comprehensive Guide to Guinea Pig Boars

All the best! Sadly human and cavy needs are never further out of sync than after the death of a piggy companion. It is a difficult period but there are ways around it as the various guides will show you. Please take the time to read them. You will find them hopefully very interesting and helpful!
 

Trufsandash

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Welcome to the Forum
:wel:

Company of their own kind really is vital for having a happy and confident guinea pig.
I am sorry you lost his brother and it sounds like he does still love and trust you, but it also sounds like he would appreciate a friend of his own kind.
Maybe some boar dating to allow him to choose a new friend when you all feel ready?
We have a sow reserved and we are just waiting for him to have his neutering operation. I am thinking of getting her a week after his op and having them with a divider in the cage for a week or 2 so that he can meet her before they go together.
 

Siikibam

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You have to wait 6 weeks post neuter before you can bond them. So the divider would have to be in for 5 weeks if you got her a week after he’s done.

Just make sure that he can’t escape to get in with her (nor the other way!) and also make sure they both have the minimum space they require. When is his op?
 

Piggies&buns

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:agr: This is correct. He cannot be put with her until six weeks after his operation otherwise before six weeks he can still get her pregnant.
 

Trufsandash

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You have to wait 6 weeks post neuter before you can bond them. So the divider would have to be in for 5 weeks if you got her a week after he’s done.

Just make sure that he can’t escape to get in with her (nor the other way!) and also make sure they both have the minimum space they require. When is his op?
His op is on 23rd Sept. I'm not too worried so much about having a litter of babies so not sure if the full 6 week separation is necessary. My concern is their health and if she gets pregnant too young. She will be around 10 weeks when we get her. I also worry if it will harm him to be sexually active after his operation.
 

Piggies&buns

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His op is on 23rd Sept. I'm not too worried so much about having a litter of babies so not sure if the full 6 week separation is necessary. My concern is their health and if she gets pregnant too young. She will be around 10 weeks when we get her. I also worry if it will harm him to be sexually active after his operation.
You neuter piggies to prevent pregnancies, therefore the full six weeks is absolutely necessary. Pregnancies comes with risks to the mother and pups. If you put him in with her before his full six weeks is up knowing that he can still get her pregnant then you be considered as intentionally breeding which is against forum rules
 

Trufsandash

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You neuter piggies to prevent pregnancies, therefore the full six weeks is absolutely necessary. Pregnancies comes with risks to the mother and pups. If you put him in with her before his full six weeks is up knowing that he can still get her pregnant then you be considered as intentionally breeding which is against forum rules
I know the reason we are having him neutered and that is to be with a female without resulting in numerous litters of babies. I am not intentionally breeding and certainly do not intend to start. I just want to get my piggys together as soon as I can. My main concern is their health and companionship and a litter would not be unwanted as such! If nature took its course and we ended up with 1 litter, we would certainly not be looking to make a profit from them or dump them on a rescue! But as I said their health and companionship is the primary concern for us!
 

Swissgreys

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I know the reason we are having him neutered and that is to be with a female without resulting in numerous litters of babies. I am not intentionally breeding and certainly do not intend to start. I just want to get my piggys together as soon as I can. My main concern is their health and companionship and a litter would not be unwanted as such! If nature took its course and we ended up with 1 litter, we would certainly not be looking to make a profit from them or dump them on a rescue! But as I said their health and companionship is the primary concern for us!
It's great that you clearly feel health and companionship are your main concerns.
If this is the case then you will not allow them to be together until 6 weeks post neutering op.
Allowing them to breed (unintentionally or not) risks the health of both piggies.
Pregnancies have a 1 in 5 chance of going wrong for the mother and babies, and your boy could suffer complications trying to mate so soon after surgery.
So you would actually be taking a huge risk which does not offer either piggy any benefit.
 

Siikibam

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I know the reason we are having him neutered and that is to be with a female without resulting in numerous litters of babies. I am not intentionally breeding and certainly do not intend to start. I just want to get my piggys together as soon as I can. My main concern is their health and companionship and a litter would not be unwanted as such! If nature took its course and we ended up with 1 litter, we would certainly not be looking to make a profit from them or dump them on a rescue! But as I said their health and companionship is the primary concern for us!
Neutering him is so that you don’t have any litter, let alone numerous ones. They can have companionship through a divider, as many piggies who don’t get on do. Their health won’t be affected by them living alongside each other for the six weeks post neuter. A litter many not be unwanted but that doesn’t mean you overlook the medical recommendation. You may not be looking to breed or sell, but putting them together before he is ‘safe’ is intentional breeding. It can’t be ‘unintentional’ when you know the facts.

We would love to see photos of your boy. And all the best when he visits the plum fairy 😁
 

Trufsandash

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It's great that you clearly feel health and companionship are your main concerns.
If this is the case then you will not allow them to be together until 6 weeks post neutering op.
Allowing them to breed (unintentionally or not) risks the health of both piggies.
Pregnancies have a 1 in 5 chance of going wrong for the mother and babies, and your boy could suffer complications trying to mate so soon after surgery.
So you would actually be taking a huge risk which does not offer either piggy any benefit.
Thank you for your advice
 

Trufsandash

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Neutering him is so that you don’t have any litter, let alone numerous ones. They can have companionship through a divider, as many piggies who don’t get on do. Their health won’t be affected by them living alongside each other for the six weeks post neuter. A litter many not be unwanted but that doesn’t mean you overlook the medical recommendation. You may not be looking to breed or sell, but putting them together before he is ‘safe’ is intentional breeding. It can’t be ‘unintentional’ when you know the facts.

We would love to see photos of your boy. And all the best when he visits the plum fairy 😁
He is featured in this months guinea pig magazine! 😁 I will share some pics of them both once we get her. Thank you
 

Lady Kelly

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I know the reason we are having him neutered and that is to be with a female without resulting in numerous litters of babies. I am not intentionally breeding and certainly do not intend to start. I just want to get my piggys together as soon as I can. My main concern is their health and companionship and a litter would not be unwanted as such! If nature took its course and we ended up with 1 litter, we would certainly not be looking to make a profit from them or dump them on a rescue! But as I said their health and companionship is the primary concern for us!
I wish to remind you that intentional breeding is prohibited on this forum. This includes any pregnancy where a male has knowingly been put with a female whilst fertile. If you choose to put your piggies together before the 6 week post neuter period has passed then you are intentionally breeding regardless of what your plans would be for any babies. There are plenty of forums out there that support breeding so if that's the support you want I would suggest you seek out an appropriate forum
 
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