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piglet_and_rogers_mama

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My two boys are still pretty young (about 4 months) and i havent noticed any problems with their teeth (the vet looked at their mouths last time we were there), but how do you know when it's time to get their teeth trimmed? Will they be eating differently, or is it subtle? I have a hard time getting them to open their mouths (for meds time), and i certainly wouldn't know when the teeth need trimmed if i could open them up. I would just like to know for when the time does come, if there is something i should be looking out for. Also, how often does it need to be done to the average pig? My boys have unlimited hay so i know they are chewing enough; plus they have some kinda hard log treat thing to chew on. Thanks!
 

Glynis

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My two boys are still pretty young (about 4 months) and i havent noticed any problems with their teeth (the vet looked at their mouths last time we were there), but how do you know when it's time to get their teeth trimmed? Will they be eating differently, or is it subtle? I have a hard time getting them to open their mouths (for meds time), and i certainly wouldn't know when the teeth need trimmed if i could open them up. I would just like to know for when the time does come, if there is something i should be looking out for. Also, how often does it need to be done to the average pig? My boys have unlimited hay so i know they are chewing enough; plus they have some kinda hard log treat thing to chew on. Thanks!

Hi :) What's the reason for their meds? if they don't have toofie probs ? sorry just enquiring..........the only reason i have taught my girls about the syringe is i had a piggie (daughters but i ended up with total care cause of so much work) who needed constant piggie dental work.
Most piggies should be ok, this is only from my experience, as long as they're fed a diet consisting of mostly hay about 80% then pellets and of course veggies for their vitamin C.......if you have a look in the food section you'll see a great thread (up the top) on foods....
http://www.theguineapigforum.co.uk/showthread.php?t=30297
I hope this helps :)
If you're still in doubt speak to your vet but i'm sure with a good diet and you regularly looking and seeing if there's anything different (aka weight, weigh regularly) you'll pick up on a problem if it does arise.........WELL DONE for thinking so far in advance! xx>>>xx>>>
 
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Hello, it's really subtle! You just have to watch out for the slightest changes in behaviour. I imagine it may be different for different piggies, but watch for them refusing favourite foods. Also the speed at which they eat, if that slows down they may be having trouble. If bits of food drop out of their mouth when they are eating and their ears are going ten to the dozen when they are eating, it's also a sign, and in my experience my piggie was always scratching at his mouth with his paw - since he had his teeth done this has stopped.
As well as this (I know this is a really long list lol) watch for your piggies appearing to chew food when they aren't actually eating, and even snuffly breathing can be a sign!
For me this all happened very gradually over a few weeks, but by the time I realised what was wrong he had stopped eating completely :( However, now that I have been through this experience I should be able to catch it early next time!
Hope that helps xox
 

Wiebke

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The best way to check is actually to weigh your piggies once weekly. It can alert you best to the fact that something (not necessarily teeth) is not right as either a sudden big drop in weight or a slow constant loss over several weeks is cause for worry.
http://www.guinealynx.info/weigh.html

Teeth do not need to be checked all the time. The initial signs are rather subtle and easy to miss; slower chewing, pickiness etc.

Healthy guinea pigs do not need any treatment at all, especially NOT having their self sharpening incisors clipped! Any vet who clips front teeth without having a good look at the back is only causing more problems and has no idea what he is about. Unless the incisors are at an angle, the cause of any uneven edges is usually a problem with the molars. Tooth problems are more frequent in older piggies, but the vast majority go through life without any problems at all.
 

piglet_and_rogers_mama

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Glynis: They are on meds because Piglet had ringworm in his ear, and the vet wants me to give it to Roger too, since they live in the same pen...the infection is clearing up great, btw!

Thanks to everyone who commented for the advice. Based on all of the tips, my boys are in the clear for now. And it looks like i gotta get a scale, too :)
 

Amanda1801

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Sounds like they may be coming to the end of their course of medication anyway, but as they are young, regular "examinations" can really help when they do need medication/treatment in the future. Have a regular feel over for any lumps/bumps, get them comfortable with their feet being touched, and also having their mouth opened. If you're unsure, ask your vet to show you a safe technique to use.

I've found with mine, that its so much easier to treat them and for them to be examined when they're used to it, and of course, less stressful for them.
 
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