• Discussions taking place within this forum are intended for the purpose of assisting you in discussing options with your vet. Any other use of advice given here is done so at your risk, is solely your responsibility and not that of this forum or its owner. Before posting it is your responsibility you abide by this Statement

Fudge & his legs

JandfpiggiesUK

Junior Guinea Pig
Joined
Feb 21, 2019
Messages
222
Reaction score
334
Points
345
Location
North East UK
Hello everyone.

As of Friday last week Fudge has been laying down with his leg elevated. He’s walking on both legs absolutely fine.
71AC205A-B6A3-4A96-BF66-2C3047CAB3CE.jpegI I took him to the vets on the same day and they gave him metacam for dogs,0.2 once daily.

The vet said if he hadn’t improved to take him back and consider an X Ray. This would involve anaesthetic & Fudge would be kept in the practice the whole day.

From what I’ve been told, Fudge is a satin piggy. Osteodystrophy is what I’m most concerned with since he’s displaying symptoms.
FCBA6ED3-CBD5-4A50-B846-13E05661C583.jpegIve spoken with other piggy owners and they’ve said the anaesthetic isn’t necessary for x Ray. I want to take him to a different vet that won’t use anaesthetic. The vet I use says it could be OD but she hasn’t heard of it being a health issue with guinea pigs.


Advice/ opinions would be appreciated.
Thanks
 

Swissgreys

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Mar 15, 2016
Messages
7,590
Reaction score
16,416
Points
1,965
Location
Zürich, Switzerland
Firstly your boy is just gorgeous - I am sorry he seems to be having problems.

In my expereince a quick wiff of gas is usually enough to ensure a guinea pig is still enough for a good x-ray.
I actually think this is less traumatic on them than a conscious x-ray which requires them to be held and often doesn't result in a clear picture.
My guinea pigs have had both types of x-ray over the years, and if at all possible I always opt for a light sedation first (for the guinea pig, not me!).

I don't think an x-ray usually requires an all day stay at the vet though. Maybe ask if you can bring him in at a specific time and wait until he is done?

At the end of the day you need to do what you are comfortable with, and if you don't think your vet is fully onboard then it might be a good idea to seek a second opinion.
 

Wiebke

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Mar 10, 2009
Messages
74,173
Reaction score
49,062
Points
3,466
Location
Coventry UK
Hello everyone.

As of Friday last week Fudge has been laying down with his leg elevated. He’s walking on both legs absolutely fine.
View attachment 154681I I took him to the vets on the same day and they gave him metacam for dogs,0.2 once daily.

The vet said if he hadn’t improved to take him back and consider an X Ray. This would involve anaesthetic & Fudge would be kept in the practice the whole day.

From what I’ve been told, Fudge is a satin piggy. Osteodystrophy is what I’m most concerned with since he’s displaying symptoms.
View attachment 154682Ive spoken with other piggy owners and they’ve said the anaesthetic isn’t necessary for x Ray. I want to take him to a different vet that won’t use anaesthetic. The vet I use says it could be OD but she hasn’t heard of it being a health issue with guinea pigs.


Advice/ opinions would be appreciated.
Thanks
Hi

I am very sorry for bringing this up, but please ask your vet to read up on, research and check for fibrous osteodystrophy in guinea pigs (Satin guinea pig syndrome/SPGS, also known as OD (osteodystrophy) or 'satin disease'). Your vet is basically on the right track but has obviously never come across the satin gene and or heard of osteodystrophy in guinea pigs, as this used to be a very breed specific problem; sadly it isn't anymore.

This way of sideways sleeping to take the pressure off the aching bones is characteristic for piggies that are developing osteodystrophy but it is not at all a normal sleeping pose for healthy piggies. The sleeping off the legs is often the first sign of SGPS in guinea pigs for those that are aware of the problem and are keeping an eye out for it, especially if they have taken in a satin piggy. Sadly it does now increasingly turn up in piggies that are not satins but perhaps may have inherited a silent satin gene from some generations back? The onset of SPGS happens typically between 12-18 months of age.
There is unfortunately no cure and the disease is progressive. It affects much more than just bones and teeth. :(

Here is some good recent information from Cavy Central Guinea Pig Rescue in Sydney. Australian rescues are currently seeing a lot of affected piggies whose owners can't pay the vet cost due to lots of backyard breeders continuing to breed and sell satin piggies to unsuspecting customers. They have all the practical experience in caring for satin piggies and are up to the most recent information, treatment and care tips.
- Satin Guinea Pig Syndrome (SGPS) from Cavy Central
- Cavy Savvy Guinea Pig Community
- Guinea Pig Welfare » Satin Guinea Pigs
- Guinea Pig Welfare » Symtoms, Diagnosis and Prognosis…
- Case Report of a Satin Guinea Pig with Fibrous Osteodystrophy That Resembles Human Pseudohypoparathyroidism
 
Top