I have 2 male piggies and I want to add another

ashhtonn7

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Hello,

I have had 2 male guinea pigs for about 3 months now and they were together for a while before that. They’re in a 2x5 C&C cage and I was wanted to add another guinea pig to my other ones. The research I’ve done says that 2 male pigs are bad for each other, and now that I think about it 1 is more dominant over the other. Should I get rid of 1 male and get a female? I’m not sure what to do
 

Rivervixen

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One pig will always be more dominant than the other, it’s perfectly normal with any pair of Guinea pigs whether they’re male or female. I wouldn’t get rid of your boy if their bond is working out. Dominance isn’t a bad thing as long as they’re not fighting and drawing blood
 

Piggies&buns

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You can’t keep three males together - there will be fights. But two together is perfectly fine and is not a problem at all - I have two males myself. It is perfectly normal to have one more dominant - that is absolutely how a functional relationship works.
I also think it is an awful shame and distasteful to ‘get rid’ of one just to get a female.
If the boys are happily bonded, then I would leave them together and enjoy them!

If you want more piggies, then it would be best to start a new pair/group.
You will need to be aware though that having any females in the same room as your current bonded boys, can cause problems within their relationship simply by smelling females. If you wish to have a sow pairing/group then ideally they need to be kept in separate room so the boys can’t see or smell them. Or, safer still, adopt a second bonded pair of boys
 
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ashhtonn7

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You can’t keep three males together - there will be fights. But two together is perfectly fine and is not a problem at all - I have two males myself. It is perfectly normal to have one more dominant - that is absolutely how a functional relationship works.
I also think it is an awful shame and distasteful to ‘get rid’ of one just to get a female.
If the boys are happily bonded, then I would leave them together and enjoy them!

If you want more piggies, then it would be best to start a new pair/group.
You will need to be aware though that having any females in the same room as your current bonded boys, can cause problems within their relationship simply by smelling females. If you wish to have a sow pairing/group then ideally they need to be kept in separate room so the boys can’t see or smell them. Or, safer still, adopt a second bonded pair of boys

I wasn’t saying I’m just going to get rid of one to get another. I was asking if it would be a better solution to rehome one of my males to get a female if it was a better solution. I shouldn’t have worded it better my apologies.
So having my 2 males is fine, and if I want to get another guinea pig, I need to keep them separate? I’m just afraid one is taking the others food and I don’t want them to be stressed
 

Piggies&buns

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I wasn’t saying I’m just going to get rid of one to get another. I was asking if it would be a better solution to rehome one of my males to get a female if it was a better solution. I shouldn’t have worded it better my apologies.
So having my 2 males is fine, and if I want to get another guinea pig, I need to keep them separate? I’m just afraid one is taking the others food and I don’t want them to be stressed

They won’t take each other’s food - they should have a large hay pile and have constant access to it, so they both can freely eat. There will be absolutely no problem with this in a functioning relationship between two boars.

You simply cannot add any more piggies in the same cage with your current two. Leave your current pair as they are as they sound happy together. Don’t separate them at all.

If you want more piggies then you need to buy another cage and start a completely separate pair of piggies.
 

ashhtonn7

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They won’t take each other’s food - they should have a large hay pile and have constant access to it, so they both can freely eat. There will be absolutely no problem with this in a functioning relationship between two boars.

You simply cannot add any more piggies in the same cage with your current two. Leave your current pair as they are as they sound happy together. Don’t separate them at all.

If you want more piggies then you need to buy another cage and start a completely separate pair of piggies.
Ok, thanks. It was just a question I had, no need to be rude about it. Idk if you’re trying to be rude or not, but the way you worded everything just seemed a bit mean
 

Siikibam

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Ok, thanks. It was just a question I had, no need to be rude about it. Idk if you’re trying to be rude or not, but the way you worded everything just seemed a bit mean
She wasn’t being rude, she was just giving you info on boars (best as pairs) and reassuring you that their relationship sounds okay. Best thing to keep it that way is to not introduce any more piggies to the pair. As an example I’ve got a pair of sows and a pair of boars. If I’m honest, i did (for a fleeting second) consider neutering then and bonding then with one sow each. But their relationship is fab so I didn’t think it was a good idea to break them up ☺️

A way to stop one hogging all the food is to have two separate feeding areas/bowls. Or to scatter feed the veg/pellets.

Unfortunately boars get a bad reputation. I have a pair of boys and they get on famously. And when it comes to food, it’s the top-pig that gets antsy about having his food nicked 🤣
 

LMPigs

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Hello

Glad that you are enjoying your new pets 😊

May I ask how old they are? I'm not quite clear from your posts whether you are seeing a problem already in the way that your two boys interact, or if you are concerned there might be a problem, based on what you have read? Either way, I think you will find the following guide helpful: Boars, sows or mixed pairs; babies or adults?

It also links to some other guides with further information (including one which is specifically focussed on Boar behaviour, and another that deals with adding additional guineas to ones you already have).

Please have a read, but do not hesitate to come back if you have further questions as there are many experts here who will do their best to help (and no-one is trying to be mean, I think it's just difficult to communicate "tone" in writing sometimes 😊)

P.s. we'd love to see some pictures of your boys
 

ashhtonn7

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She wasn’t being rude, she was just giving you info on boars (best as pairs) and reassuring you that their relationship sounds okay. Best thing to keep it that way is to not introduce any more piggies to the pair. As an example I’ve got a pair of sows and a pair of boars. If I’m honest, i did (for a fleeting second) consider neutering then and bonding then with one sow each. But their relationship is fab so I didn’t think it was a good idea to break them up ☺

A way to stop one hogging all the food is to have two separate feeding areas/bowls. Or to scatter feed the veg/pellets.

Unfortunately boars get a bad reputation. I have a pair of boys and they get on famously. And when it comes to food, it’s the top-pig that gets antsy about having his food nicked 🤣
I’ll try out getting another food bowl or something for the other guinea pig. Thanks.
 

ashhtonn7

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Hello

Glad that you are enjoying your new pets 😊

May I ask how old they are? I'm not quite clear from your posts whether you are seeing a problem already in the way that your two boys interact, or if you are concerned there might be a problem, based on what you have read? Either way, I think you will find the following guide helpful: Boars, sows or mixed pairs; babies or adults?

It also links to some other guides with further information (including one which is specifically focussed on Boar behaviour, and another that deals with adding additional guineas to ones you already have).

Please have a read, but do not hesitate to come back if you have further questions as there are many experts here who will do their best to help (and no-one is trying to be mean, I think it's just difficult to communicate "tone" in writing sometimes 😊)

P.s. we'd love to see some pictures of your boys
They are over a year old. An old friend of mine gave me hers and she said the first one she got is over a year old and the other one was adopted by her a while later. So I’m not sure of the exact age they are
 

Siikibam

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I’ll try out getting another food bowl or something for the other guinea pig. Thanks.
Best thing to do is to have two of everything, including bottles etc. That way the dominant piggy can’t stop the underpig from getting to whatever it is.

We’d love to see some photos of your boys.
 

ashhtonn7

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Hello

Glad that you are enjoying your new pets 😊

May I ask how old they are? I'm not quite clear from your posts whether you are seeing a problem already in the way that your two boys interact, or if you are concerned there might be a problem, based on what you have read? Either way, I think you will find the following guide helpful: Boars, sows or mixed pairs; babies or adults?

It also links to some other guides with further information (including one which is specifically focussed on Boar behaviour, and another that deals with adding additional guineas to ones you already have).

Please have a read, but do not hesitate to come back if you have further questions as there are many experts here who will do their best to help (and no-one is trying to be mean, I think it's just difficult to communicate "tone" in writing sometimes 😊)

P.s. we'd love to see some pictures of your boys
The brown one is Louis and the black one is Harry (they’re named after Harry Styles and Louis Tomlinson from One Directon lol)
 

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ashhtonn7

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Best thing to do is to have two of everything, including bottles etc. That way the dominant piggy can’t stop the underpig from getting to whatever it is.

We’d love to see some photos of your boys.
I added some pics!
And thank you
 

LMPigs

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They are over a year old. An old friend of mine gave me hers and she said the first one she got is over a year old and the other one was adopted by her a while later. So I’m not sure of the exact age they are

That's good, if they have got through most of their "adolescent" phase then their bond is hopefully a good one.

@Siikibam's tip of giving them two of everything so they can have one each is a good one. We have two boys and we spread their veggies all over the cage so they have to hunt for it, and also so that one of them cannot hoard all of it from the other

Updated to add: cute pigtures!
 

ashhtonn7

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That's good, if they have got through most of their "adolescent" phase then their bond is hopefully a good one.

@Siikibam's tip of giving them two of everything so they can have one each is a good one. We have two boys and we spread their veggies all over the cage so they have to hunt for it, and also so that one of them cannot hoard all of it from the other

Updated to add: cute pigtures!
I just moved them into a C&C cage so hopefully they’ll get used to the now bigger space they have lol and it’ll be easier to spread out their food that way too
 

Piggiewheekwheek

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You can’t keep three males together - there will be fights. But two together is perfectly fine and is not a problem at all - I have two males myself. It is perfectly normal to have one more dominant - that is absolutely how a functional relationship works.
I also think it is an awful shame and distasteful to ‘get rid’ of one just to get a female.
If the boys are happily bonded, then I would leave them together and enjoy them!

If you want more piggies, then it would be best to start a new pair/group.
You will need to be aware though that having any females in the same room as your current bonded boys, can cause problems within their relationship simply by smelling females. If you wish to have a sow pairing/group then ideally they need to be kept in separate room so the boys can’t see or smell them. Or, safer still, adopt a second bonded pair of boys
Not strictly true lol,I rehomed my boar trio 3 months ago,they live happily together although I think they have been together all their lives so maybe not so easy introducing more males to an established group.😊
 

Piggies&buns

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Not strictly true lol,I rehomed my boar trio 3 months ago,they live happily together although I think they have been together all their lives so maybe not so easy introducing more males to an established group.😊

Adding a third boar to an established pair will be likely to fail and at worst can break all bonds resulting in three singles piggies. Even boars who are siblings can result in failure. It’s just a rather hard thing to get to work, so do enjoy your trio! It’s rather rare to see one working out - we see more posts from failures than successes sadly
 
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