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Polycystic Ovaries And A Tumour :-(

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Battylady

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Hello everyone, I am new here and am hoping that some of you can give me the benefit of your experience. My piggy, Nutty, has a tumour on her tummy and polycystic ovaries. Obviously I took her to the vet as soon as I noticed the problem. My dilemma is that the vet has given me a choice of (1) an op (remove tumour, which he 'thinks' is probably benign) and to have her spayed, and option (2) which is to leave her and see how she gets on, on the basis that there's a chance neither issue will get any worse and she might live for years with no real problems. He said the op would be quite major and carries the usual risks, although at the moment Nutty is strong and in really good health generally. My inclination is to have the op, but I really would like to know how other piggies have got on after being spayed... are they usually OK, if they are in pretty good health before hand? All that matters to me is that I do the best for my pig, and I'd love to know how others have got on after a major op. I just hate the idea of doing what I think is best and then regretting it.
Thank you fellow Piggy Parents!
 

Elwickcavies

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With ovarian cysts, there is the option of treatment with hCG (chorulon), which is a hormone. I have heard mixed reports on it's effectiveness though. The problem is these cysts can enlarge and burst, with tragic results, so I would be inclined to treat them if at all possible. As there is a tumour, it may be a good idea to get her spayed at the same time as removing the growth (this is the only guaranteed cure for cysts). It is a big op though, but one that many, many sows have come through with no problems. Recently, more spaying ops are being done via the flanks - there are two incisions, but much easier access to the ovaries than through the abdomen, and better recovery I believe. How old is Nutty? If she is in good health and not elderly, she is in the best condition to come through the GA, but bear in mind this "double op" will be longer, and the risks increase the longer the animal is under. I hope that has helped a bit. I'm sure others will have personal experience of spaying ops (I haven't, I'm afraid). I'm sure you will do the best thing for Nutty. You know her best and you will be able to weigh up the risks and benefits.
 

Freela

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How old is Nutty? I would be more inclined to treat more aggressively if she is a younger pig. There is more risk in surgery with an older pig, and less time left complications to arise during the course of their normal lifespan. I haven't personally had to spay, though I know some on here have and can probably give you a better idea of what to expect and the pros and cons. Given the choice, in a younger pig I would be likely to do the op, knowing that a ruptured ovarian cyst is a life-threatening emergency where they are less likely to pull through surgery. In an older pig (say 5 and up) I would be more likely to wait and see. Lots of luck- I know it's a hard decision!
 

Flutterby

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I don't have any experience with things like this, but I just wanted to say I'm sending healing vibes your way!
 

Lady Kelly

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Again I would factor age into any treatment options but I would also be inclined to seriously consider surgery because knowing for definite whether a growth is benign or not is really going to help with future treatments. I've had ovarian cysts in an older piggie that didn't really cause problems (she was old and had underlying renal disease so operating wasn't an option) and I've had ovarian cysts in a middle aged piggie (4 years) which caused incontinence and urine scalds around her bum. The latter was spayed and coped extremely well with the op and is a picture of health now.
 

Battylady

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Thanks very much, everyone! Nutty will be 3 in March so she definitely has youth and general good health on her side. I am leaning towards having the op. I don't want to leave it and then wish I hadn't if she gets too ill to operate. I guess it's just one of those things where in the end you have to decide what you think is best and then know that, whatever happens, you did what you truly believed to be in your pig's best interest.
 

Lady Kelly

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As long as you trust your vet and their knowledge in treating guinea pigs I'm sure you (and Nutty) will be fine. She'll just need quiet and warm time to recover and keeping an eye on incase of any complications. My vet decided to spay by going through the flank rather than the tummy for Bumble's cysts and although it meant the poor girl had two big shaved patches and staples I believe it did heal a lot quicker and cleaner than my boys neutering did!
 
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