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Possible GI Stasis?

skyperch

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IMPORTANT NOTE: I am not able to get an appointment to a vet at the moment. The vets I know of that treat exotics, due to COVID, only have openings starting in September, and my normal vet is at another location right now due to the same reason. She will supposedly be in tomorrow, and I am going to see what availability there is then, but for now, a vet is not an option.

My guinea pig is having some issues. I have three girls, and she is the youngest of the three. My friend, who is well-versed and experienced with small animals, suspects GI stasis based on the symptoms. I didn't know what it was before, so I'm only going based off of what I was told. Within the last week I attempted switching over to a new (better) brand of food, since I've had them for over a month and wanted to start the transition. However, it seems like I may have moved too fast with transitioning, even though they are eating the new food.

The first day I noticed (about three days ago), she seemed very lethargic and her eyes had a lot of gunk in them (although I'm not sure if the eyes are related to this, it's worth mentioning). Since then she has perked up a bit, but she seems to be having quite a bit of discomfort. Although I haven't had her long, she has never really given me much problems with being held, but now she squeals as though in pain when I pick her up. I have been giving her critical care for the last two days through a syringe mixed with water, and she does at least seem to have an appetite, as I have noticed her at the food bowl and I suspect she's eating her greens and hay as well (given the other two living with her, I can only go based on what I have physically seen). I have also been giving her syringe fulls of water, which she takes willingly, even though I do believe she has been drinking from her water bottle. I have since bought their old food again, and am trying to incorporate some of that back in again to help things a bit.

Her poop, while solid, was a bit stringy last time I saw it, and I can't be sure how much she's actually going. I considered setting up a temporary cage to monitor, but I'm afraid that moving her away from her cage-mates might do more harm/stress than good.

I'm hoping it's a simple issue that can be resolved, but I am prepared to go to a vet if necessary. However, since that is not an available, I need to know if there's anything more I can do to help in the meantime.
 

Siikibam

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I’m afraid a vet is the only way you will be able to find out what is wrong. I would ring at opening time and try to get her an appointment.

You need to start weighing her daily at the same time and adjust the syringe feeding accordingly - she needs to be maintaining or putting on weight. You can’t judge how much hay she eats by eye hence the weekly weigh in for healthy piggies. Also, do you hear sounds when you put your ear to her

Another alternative to critical care is poo soup from one of you’re other healthy piggies. Otherwise please do get her seen. They can hide illnesses for a long time and if she is squeaking in pain that’s not a good sign either. If she’s still not herself it’s important she gets checked over.

GI stasis (read the guide below) is usually shown by severe or total lack of appetite as well as near/total silence instead of the usual healthy gurgling sounds of the gut.

Lastly, if her poos seem soft or misshapen then take her off veg until at least 24 hours (better 48) after her poos return to normal.
Digestive Disorders: Diarrhea - Bloat - GI Stasis (No Gut Movement) And Not Eating
Complete Syringe Feeding Guide
 

Piggies&buns

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:agr:

Weighing her is the only way of knowing she is getting enough hay. If her weight goes down, she isn’t eating enough. Hay is the most important part of their diet. Veg and pellets are merely snacks (only jointly account for 20% of The daily food intake) so eating those doesn’t count for much if they aren’t eating enough hay as it means their overall food intake has reduced dramatically. Watching her isn’t enough to know she is eating enough

GI stasis is a medical emergency so if you were to suspect it, she needs urgent vet care as a delay could be fatal.

Not Eating, Weight Loss And The Importance Of Syringe Feeding Fibre
Weight - Monitoring and Management
 

skyperch

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Unfortunately she did end up passing overnight. We have very few exotic vets near us, and even fewer ones available for emergencies.

Thanks for the info anyway.
 

skyperch

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Can I ask, what can be done at home if a vet isn't immediately available? Even with my rats, I seem to continuously run into the problem of it being a sudden issue and/or happening on the weekend when I cannot access them.

I'm so angry, I feel like I need someone to blame. I know I can't really blame the vets... but it does bother me that there are so few exotic vets, and even less that are available in an emergency.
 

Siikibam

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I’m afraid there really isn’t anything you can do at hone for particular illnesses. Stepping in with syringe feeding if they’re not eating and continually losing weight is the only thing you can do really.

Having a lack of vets experienced in treating guinea pigs, or no out-of-hours care does come with frustration. But you really can’t blame the vets. It may be they’re a ‘new’ pet and actually they’re not required to learn about them during training. Sad as it is, that’s just the way it is.

I’m sorry for your loss. Take time to grieve and you’re welcome to post about your piggy in the rainbow pets section.
 

Gem789

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Can I ask, what can be done at home if a vet isn't immediately available? Even with my rats, I seem to continuously run into the problem of it being a sudden issue and/or happening on the weekend when I cannot access them.

I'm so angry, I feel like I need someone to blame. I know I can't really blame the vets... but it does bother me that there are so few exotic vets, and even less that are available in an emergency.
I'm so sorry to hear she passed. I'll post some links that might be useful to read through x
Emergency, Crisis and Bridging Care until a Vet Appointment
Complete Syringe Feeding Guide
Not Eating, Weight Loss And The Importance Of Syringe Feeding Fibre
 
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