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Single Guinea Pig

77ricky

New Born Pup
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Hello

I was hoping for a bit of info, my daughter has x2 male guinea pigs, they are rescues we have had them approx a year and a half and the previous owner had them about the same amount of time.

Unfortunately it looks like we are going to be losing one, he has been very poorly and been to the vets and is going again tomorrow and I'm not expecting to be coming back:(

Would the remaining boy be able to be bonded to a new freind? If so? Any advice would be great.
 
I’m so sorry to hear this.

Yes he will be able to be rebonded (and indeed he should be) to a new friend.

The best way to do this is with the help of a rescue centre. They will ensure he has compatibility with a new pig and therefore a success bond.
If rescue dating is not an option for you and you have to buy a piggy from a pet shop for example, then getting a baby boy would be wise. A baby cannot challenge hierarchy and they are usually accepted (but do be aware it’s not a guarantee).
Also, there is a risk that once the baby becomes a teenager that he would then challenge.
If you have to buy a baby then ensure you have a plan b for picking arrangements in case the bond fails.

The guide of how to carry out a neutral territory bonding is attached below

Bonding and Interaction: Illustrated social behaviours and bonding dynamics
 
Hello

I was hoping for a bit of info, my daughter has x2 male guinea pigs, they are rescues we have had them approx a year and a half and the previous owner had them about the same amount of time.

Unfortunately it looks like we are going to be losing one, he has been very poorly and been to the vets and is going again tomorrow and I'm not expecting to be coming back:(

Would the remaining boy be able to be bonded to a new freind? If so? Any advice would be great.

Hi and welcome

BIG HUGS

I am ever so sorry. You are quite obviously a very caring and loving owner.

Unless your surviving boy stops eating and drinking (which is thankfully rare), you have usually got ideally 1-4 weeks' time to allow your boy to do his own grieving and to find a suitable new friend. In the case of neutering, it is OK to wait even longer for the greater future gain in terms of getting a wife. This also means that your daughter and you have also got a little time to get through the very roughest bit of grieving.

Many boars of all ages can find a new friend, either and adult boar via rescue dating or a baby boy (although acceptance is not guaranteed - one baby may fail but his brother may turn out to be an instant hit...).
Sometimes it is another smilarly aged bereaved single as a next door neighbour with interaction through the bars if they agree on disagreeing and prefer their own territory but still have a bond through their interaction. That would be your fallback plan B.

You may find the practical information in these guide links here very helpful in navigating the coming the weeks:

A Practical and Sensitive Guide to Dying, Terminal Illness and Euthanasia in Guinea Pigs
Human Bereavement: Grieving, Processing and Support Links for Guinea Pig Owners and Their Children

Looking After a Bereaved Guinea Pig
A Comprehensive Guide to Guinea Pig Boars (with chapters on companionship options and a discussion thereof)
Rescues (Adoption and Dating), Shops, Breeders or Online? - What to consider when getting guinea pigs
 
I’m so sorry to hear this.

Yes he will be able to be rebonded (and indeed he should be) to a new friend.

The best way to do this is with the help of a rescue centre. They will ensure he has compatibility with a new pig and therefore a success bond.
If rescue dating is not an option for you and you have to buy a piggy from a pet shop for example, then getting a baby boy would be wise. A baby cannot challenge hierarchy and they are usually accepted (but do be aware it’s not a guarantee).
Also, there is a risk that once the baby becomes a teenager that he would then challenge.
If you have to buy a baby then ensure you have a plan b for picking arrangements in case the bond fails.

The guide of how to carry out a neutral territory bonding is attached below

Bonding and Interaction: Illustrated social behaviours and bonding dynamics
 
Thank you for your reply I'll have a good read of that today and will get my daughter to do the same, it's reassuring to know that he can be paired up again with care.
 
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