So I have 2 questions!

Daisylovepiggies

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1. Is it safe to introduce a male boar to 4 sows? This boar is a breeding boar, but lately, he hasn't been doing his job and they want to replace him. I offered to adopt him. Can a boar live happily with 4 sows without them picking on him or something

2. How should I introduce him to them? In their cage, or in an outside pen. Floortime? And do you think I should treat him for mites just in case.

Thanks <3
 

Piggies&buns

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A boar can only be added after he is neutered and then had his six week wait. He may not have been ‘doing his job’ but please do not put him with your sows until he is neutered and had his six week post op wait to be infertile.
Neutered / De-sexed Boars And Neutering Operations: Myths, Facts and Post-op Care

Do not treat him for anything unless a vet tells you to do so for a diagnosed illness - it would be wise to have any new piggy vet checked in any event. You will need to quarantine him in a separate room for two weeks to ensure he is fully healthy (along with the vet check) before moving him to live in a separate cage next to your sows. Once he is neutered and six weeks post, you can attempt a bonding.

Any introduction needs to be done properly , all in go (post neutering) following the correct neutral territory procedure. Do not put a piggy directly into the territory of other piggies - it is a sure fire way of causing a fight and ruining any chance of bonding.
The correct procedure is detailed here
Bonding and Interaction: Illustrated social behaviours and bonding dynamics
Dominance Behaviours In Guinea Pigs
Adding More Guinea Pigs Or Merging Pairs – What Works And What Not?
One neutered boar can live with any number of sows but any bonding comes down to character compatibility - as you will be taking him on spec you will need to prepare for the fact that the sows may not accept him and he could have to live in a separate cage alongside the girls for companionship.

You will also need to ensure your cage is big enough for five - that is a 7x2 c&c or 240cm x 60cm.
 
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Swissgreys

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Please do take on board the advice above, or you could be placing your sows in danger by allowing them to get pregnant.
Boars never stop 'doing their job' - he may just be less efficient than he once was, hence the breeders wanting to get rid of him.

Once he has been neutered and waited a full six weeks you could certainly try bonding him, but it still comes down to individual personalities and whether he can fit into your current group.
As the breeder has clearly made money from him throughout his life, maybe they will pay to have him neutered to secure his happy retirement?
 

Daisylovepiggies

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Thank you so much for your advice. So this guinea pig came from an animal reserve, and they want to get more pups, hence the need to replace him. But if I didn't get him neutered and he did impregnate one of my sows I would probably give the pups to the reserve.
Would that be okay?
Sorry, I don't have much experience with this.
 

Piggies&buns

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Thank you so much for your advice. So this guinea pig came from an animal reserve, and they want to get more pups, hence the need to replace him. But if I didn't get him neutered and he did impregnate one of my sows I would probably give the pups to the reserve.
Would that be okay?
Sorry, I don't have much experience with this.

No that’s not ok. Please do not put an intact boar with your sows. There is no way anybody on this forum would support you intentionally putting him with your sows to just give the pups back to a reserve
if you knowingly put an unneutered boar in with sows then you are intentionally breeding which is against forum rules, but most importantly you will potentially be putting the lives of your sows and any pups at risk - not all pregnancies have happy endings.

if you take him on, then please get him neutered and complete his six week post op wait before putting him anywhere near your sows.
 

VickiA

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Thank you so much for your advice. So this guinea pig came from an animal reserve, and they want to get more pups, hence the need to replace him. But if I didn't get him neutered and he did impregnate one of my sows I would probably give the pups to the reserve.
Would that be okay?
Sorry, I don't have much experience with this.
Please do not let an intact male anywhere near your sows. That is intentional breeding and something that we do not tolerate on this forum. A very significant proportion of guinea pig pregnancies do not end well for mum or babies. They can end in death of the sow and her pups in some circumstances. Please do not put your sows in peril in this way.
 

Swissgreys

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Thank you so much for your advice. So this guinea pig came from an animal reserve, and they want to get more pups, hence the need to replace him. But if I didn't get him neutered and he did impregnate one of my sows I would probably give the pups to the reserve.
Would that be okay?
Sorry, I don't have much experience with this.
Do the pups in this 'reserve' live an amazing life, or are they there simply to make money?
Breeding is risky and often ends in the death of sows or pups or both.
Why does the reserve need more pups?

To be honest I would steer well clear of any person that simply hands over guinea pigs once they are no longer useful - it shows clearly how much they value the life of a living creature.
 

Siikibam

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I think it’s best if you don’t take this boar on. And I would certainly not help the reserve by getting your sows pregnant. Getting rid of a boar because he isn’t ‘performing’ any more is enough for you to turn around fast and run for the hills.

He may even have other issues going on that they don’t tell you about. It’s up to you what you decide to do, but go in with eyes pinned wide open. If you decide to intentionally breed then your membership will be swiftly terminated.

Enjoy your four girls.
 

Siikibam

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I took everyone's advice and didn't take on the boar! My girls are happy by themselves and I don't want to ruin that!
Have an amazing day!
So glad to hear that! I’m sorry if it seems that we were piling up on you, but what you suggested would have really been about you and not your sows or (potential) boar or the pups that would have arrived as a result of letting him in with your sows. If the reserve can discard the boar because he’s not...virile enough then you have to wonder how they treat any guinea pigs in their care.

You made the right choice for your girls. Unfortunately we can’t rescue them all ☹
 
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