COVID-19 Vets are no longer key workers

rp1993

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Have just heard from a friend that vets outside of the food chain are no longer classed as key workers, although still expected to provide emergency care I assume this will reduce services which is a real shame for any animals that need it!
 

Crystella

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This just seems very wrong. In the other lockdowns they were but all of a sudden they're not?
 

Lady Kelly

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It will not change how the practice is run or what work is undertaken. The clarification about classification as "key worker" is for the purpose of childcare... i.e. can they still send their child to school. The answer to that is no. What your friend seems to have missed off is that care is still an obligation outside of food processing etc

I've attached a screenshot from the rcvs page
 

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Swissgreys

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Have just heard from a friend that vets outside of the food chain are no longer classed as key workers, although still expected to provide emergency care I assume this will reduce services which is a real shame for any animals that need it!
Before quoting things from a friend, it is important to check the facts too.

Vets are no longer considered essential key workers when it comes to childcare options. So their children are not automatically eligible to attend school or childcare services, which of course will be a problem for many vets.
However to put this in perspective veterinary services are still considered essential, and they are allowed to perform both emergency and non emergency work that is essential to animal welfare.

The full statement is here, but basically they can continue to offer services as normal, but they can't send their children to school as essential key workers. This is clearly limiting for some vets, but not quite as black and white as stating there will be reduced veterinary services.

The official statement with more details can be seen here:
Joint RCVS, BVA and BVNA statement on critical/key worker status for vets in England
 

rp1993

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Thank you for the full clarification, I wasn’t sure what it would fully mean for vet services so hopefully they will continue with little disruption
 

Lady Kelly

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Thank you for the full clarification, I wasn’t sure what it would fully mean for vet services so hopefully they will continue with little disruption
The way I read it is that things like neutering operations may not go ahead as it's not essential and isn't going to bring a health benefit but necessary surgery would. I think that's what they mean about triage. When my dog was due his flea and worm tablets I had to answer some questions over the phone about him and any change in weight. Then they told me when the tablets would be ready and I ring the doorbell and they brought them out to me. I don't think this has changed at all with the current lockdown
 

furryfriends (TEAS)

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Many vets have young children, so won't be able to work now. I guessed something was happening, as I've seen many people on cat groups, saying their vet has cancelled their cats neutering op. This is extremely concerning, especially as we approach kitten season in a few months. I can see there being an awful lot of unwanted and abandoned kittens, over the next few months. Yes, you can say that people should keep their cats indoors, if not neutered, but a cat in season will call for a male and will also do her best to escape to allow her access to the male. My Priya had her first season, just days before she was booked in for spay. Suddenly she started this awful banshee wailing and immediately a couple of tom cats appeared in the garden. Luckily she was safely in the house, but this awful wailing continued on and off overnight too, so I can see why some people would eventually let their cat out, if only to try and get some sleep. I really think that feline spays should be prioritised, even if the castrates are put on hold. Luckily our vets are working as normal, but it does mean that they are becoming very much more busy, as their client base is growing rapidly, due to many people going to them, instead of their usual practice. This will have an impact on TEAS, as we have a large number of guinea pigs who will need to be neutered in about a months time, but their ops will be pushed back, as not as necessary right now. I really worry that cat rescue centres are going to be totally over-run during the year!
 

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Yes I agree Debbie, hopefully most vets will call it based on the longer term effects as well. Dog neutering for example. Hopefully there will be a weigh up in the longer term risk of cancer and it would be good if consideration of home situation is taken into account. For example, Archer goes to day care 2 days a week and his day care stipulates that all adult dogs need to be spayed or neutered. This isn't an issue for us as he's already castrated and we are home so going there isn't essential but if we were key workers and not able to be home it would be good if vets could support that. (That said hopefully key workers haven't been taking on pets in this pandemic to lead to this situation)
 

Tigermoth

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(That said hopefully key workers haven't been taking on pets in this pandemic to lead to this situation)
You’d be surprised. Several colleagues have taken on puppies because they are having such a hard time at work and want to make home much lovelier. I have to say, the thought of having a pup to snuggle is very very appealing just now. I love the gruesome twosome dearly but they are rubbish at having a decent cuddle without peeing on me!
 

Lady Kelly

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You’d be surprised. Several colleagues have taken on puppies because they are having such a hard time at work and want to make home much lovelier. I have to say, the thought of having a pup to snuggle is very very appealing just now. I love the gruesome twosome dearly but they are rubbish at having a decent cuddle without peeing on me!
Yes I can definitely see the appeal and I suppose the optimist will think that in 6 months time when they want neutering vets might be operating as normal. I'm definitely not an optimist and no matter how tough things get I can't imagine taking on any pets during this pandemic except maybe a piggy if for some horrendous reason I was left with one (I have 4 of various ages all living together so I hope that wouldn't happen for some time)
 

piggieminder

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It's been hard enough getting appointments here as it is, 3 weeks for an exotics. 3 times in the last few months I've paid an emergency fee to see a general vet. Only one of those visits was worth it, luckily thanks to the forum I knew the advise I was given was wrong and could adjust treatment accordingly.
 
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