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Where does ringworm and mange mites come from?

BearAndPanda

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Okay so I’ve been a bit curious. I’ve had pigs that have had ringworm and it got treated and cleared up. I just want to know where it comes from? Is it bedding? Is it hay? I’m not really sure.
 

VickiA

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The answer is never quite clear. It’s often a process of elimination.
 

Pound Shilling & Pig

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Ringworm is fungal and can be spread by direct contact but also can be spread by fungal spores which are airborne
 

VickiA

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I’ve had ringworm come in on breeder piggies who’ve been kept in poor conditions and whose immune system is compromised. I’ve also had an otherwise healthy piggy here who developed ringworm and it was suspected to have come from lawn time on grass that foxes and badgers frequent.
 

BearAndPanda

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I’ve had ringworm come in on breeder piggies who’ve been kept in poor conditions and whose immune system is compromised. I’ve also had an otherwise healthy piggy here who developed ringworm and it was suspected to have come from lawn time on grass that foxes and badgers frequent.
Ah okay. It’s really good I joined this forum as I feel I can get support 24/7 from highly experienced people. Thank you xx:hug:
 

Wiebke

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Okay so I’ve been a bit curious. I’ve had pigs that have had ringworm and it got treated and cleared up. I just want to know where it comes from? Is it bedding? Is it hay? I’m not really sure.
All the most common health issues listed in our new owners' pitfalls guide have one thing in common - exposure either in their birth environment or in the sales place in close company plus the stress of the massive upheaval of being ripped from their family and then arriving in the complete alien and complex home environment of a pet owner. All of these issues are normally kept under control/fended off by a fully working immune system. It the combination of the two that does the damage.
New guinea pigs: Sexing, vet checks&customer rights, URI, ringworm and parasites

Ringworm spores can be anywhere in the environment as it doesn't only affect pets but also wild animals and the spores can be blown around and affect many species. However, ringworm is typically a new owner's problem as it is very hard to remove from a commercial environment.
Some pet chains tend to have different issues that are endemic - in the UK, ringworm is the most common problem while URI and mange mites have been mostly eradicated after a complete change of breeding stock/commercial supplier in the largest pet shop chain some years ago. URI and mange mites are still much more common in the USA.
With breeders you can expect anything; it is your luck of the draw how good their health care practice and willingness to spend cash on comparatively expensive vet grade ivermectin is. The most welfare savvy one are usually not the ones that are the ones selling without asking any questions...
Ringworm can also be carried into the house by dogs or cats roaming outside the house. Spores are more likely to be picked up in an area where infected piggies are in close contact or an environment that is being used by group after group of stressed young rodents and rabbits...

Mange mite eggs are present in the skin of many piggies; they are usually kept under control by a fully working immune system. It is best to just hit them hard if (ever) they make an appearance. They are generally transmitted from animal to animal and are species specific.
Hay mites - as their name says - can come with hay. We have seen a steep rise since pet shop chains in the UK started selling importes international branded hay.
Lice are comparatively rare in well kept piggies, especially in indoors piggies.

Just to recap - you need the combination of exposure and lowered immune system (stress, neglect, illness, pregnancy (i.e. overloaded immune system), babies (immune system still under construction) or old age/frailness (no longer as strong and flexible immune system).

The best long term prevention is normal good care and a good hay based diet with very few pellets and very little in the way of sugary veg (like carrots) and fruit. Health and a strong immune system really starts in the gut!
 

BearAndPanda

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All the most common health issues listed in our new owners' pitfalls guide have one thing in common - exposure either in their birth environment or in the sales place in close company plus the stress of the massive upheaval of being ripped from their family and then arriving in the complete alien and complex home environment of a pet owner. All of these issues are normally kept under control/fended off by a fully working immune system. It the combination of the two that does the damage.
New guinea pigs: Sexing, vet checks&customer rights, URI, ringworm and parasites

Ringworm can be anywhere in the environment as it doesn't only affect pets but also wild animals and the spores can be blown around and affect many species. However, ringworm is typically a new owner's problem as it is very hard to remove from a commercial environment. Some pet chains tend to have different issues that are endemic - in the UK, ringworm is the most common problem while URI and mange mites have been mostly eradicated after a complete change of breeding stock/commercial supplier. URI and mange mites are still much more common in the USA. With breeders you can expect anything; it is your luck of the draw how good their health care practice and willingness to spend cash on comparatively expensive vet grade ivermectin is. The most welfare savvy one are usually not the ones that are the ones selling without asking any questions...
Ringworm can also be carried into the house by dogs or cats roaming outside the house.

Mange mite eggs are present in the skin of many piggies; they are usually kept under control by a fully working immune system. It is best to just hit them hard if (ever) they make an appearance. They are generally transmitted from animal to animal and are species specific.
Hay mites - as their name says - can come with hay. We have seen a steep rise since pet shop chains in the UK started selling importet international branded hay.
Lice are comparatively rare in well kept piggies, especially in indoors piggies.

Just to recap - you need the combination of exposure and lowered immune system (stress, neglect, illness, pregnancy (i.e. overloaded immune system), babies (immune system still under construction) or old age/frailness (no longer as strong and flexible immune system).

The best long term prevention is normal good care and a good hay based diet with very few pellets and very little in the way of sugary veg (like carrots) and fruit. Health and a strong immune system really starts in the gut!
What are some examples of sugary veg just in case I feed it too often?
 

Siikibam

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The feeding guide is a good place to start. But I think it’s mainly carrots that are sweet veg.
 

Wiebke

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What are some examples of sugary veg just in case I feed it too often?
Have a look at our diet guide; it is very detailed and makes a great resource for checking up things. Any root veg but especially carrots and sweet corn are the high sugar content veg. Feeding carrot is like feeding a bar of chocolate to a guinea pig or rabbit (see chapter 8 of the diet guide). Here is the link: Long Term Balanced General And Special Needs Guinea Pig Diets
 
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