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Dental Vet Stumped By Toast's Dental Problem

Beans&Toast

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Sorry this is slighlty long but I'll try keep this as to the point as I can. Today Toast had her 6th or 7th dental (I've lost count) in the space of around 1 year.

Up until now, the issue has always been that her back molars were slightly over growing by about 3 mm over a period of time and she was developing spurs which caused issues trying to chew. My vet would burr them down and she would be back to normal for a while.

Side note: Toast was recently spayed as it was thought that the reason her teeth kept over growing was due to her not eating when in pain brought on by bloat, which was being caused by hormonal issues. So she was spayed 3 weeks ago, which we thought would hopefully solve the problem. It has solved the bloat problem but not the dental problems.

So she was in this morning for what I assumed would be another burr of her back molars. The vet phoned to say that unlike all the other times, her teeth are actually fine, he took a few x-rays too and they didn't show any issues either. What he noticed was that she had a massive collection of gunk in her gums at her top and bottom incisors. He said it wasn't an infection or anything, it was a build up of hay/food etc. This would have caused her to be in discomfort while eating, so he cleared all the gunk from her gums and she's back home now.

The issue is that he has no idea why this is happening, it was never a problem in the 2 years I've had her until about 6 months ago. This is the 2nd time this had happened and for a while we had weekly nurse appointments to clear it until it seemed to stop. My vet has advised twice weekly nurse appointments for now to keep an eye on her gums and clear them if need be.



Does anyone have any idea why and how she's getting a build up of food stuck in her gums? Her top and bottom incisors are fine, not loose or anything. I don't understand it and my vet really doesn't know what's causing it (he is excellent and very experienced with guinea pigs).

I've noticed some unusual behaviour in that for about 3 weeks she's been chewing cardboard constantly - all day and night like a baby who's teething. (That may stop now that her teeth have been cleaned, I'll need to wait and see).

I'll also mention that up until Toast was spayed 3 weeks ago, she could only have very small amounts of grass every so often as it made her bloat like mad. Now the bloat is gone she's been gradually introduced to larger amounts of fresh grass. I don't know if that could have anything to do with any of it at all? I'm really getting quite distressed with this, for Toast's sake and because it's costing an absolute fortune for all these dentals.
 
D

DM030819

Furryfriends is pretty busy wih the rescue at the moment so I don't think she'll be around to respond for a while.

I'm not an expert with teeth so can't really help greatly.

Whereabouts is the buildup? Around her teeth? Can you see it if you move her lips, or is it further back in her mouth? Pigs can have a bit of food in their mouths due to the gap between the front and back teeth. That's a reason why some vets say they can't see their back teeth, and why some want them starving before anaesthetic (which is stupid).

Is there any way that you can clean it for her if it is an issue? Maybe syringe her a bit of water?

In my experience chewing more cardboard than usual is done when they're in pain or uncomfortable. My bladder stone boar did it when he had stones and another boy did it recently when he had a stomach upset.

It could be that she's just happy to be able to do it again, and is making the most of it.

Could the buildup in her mouth be grass? If she's not used to it and is having more then maybe it's causing a stomach upset which might make her sore and so she's chewing cardboard?

I could be completely wrong of course so don't worry. If she's eating and acting okay then it's probably not that.
 

Beans&Toast

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Furryfriends is pretty busy wih the rescue at the moment so I don't think she'll be around to respond for a while.

I'm not an expert with teeth so can't really help greatly.

Whereabouts is the buildup? Around her teeth? Can you see it if you move her lips, or is it further back in her mouth? Pigs can have a bit of food in their mouths due to the gap between the front and back teeth. That's a reason why some vets say they can't see their back teeth, and why some want them starving before anaesthetic (which is stupid).

Is there any way that you can clean it for her if it is an issue? Maybe syringe her a bit of water?

In my experience chewing more cardboard than usual is done when they're in pain or uncomfortable. My bladder stone boar did it when he had stones and another boy did it recently when he had a stomach upset.

It could be that she's just happy to be able to do it again, and is making the most of it.

Could the buildup in her mouth be grass? If she's not used to it and is having more then maybe it's causing a stomach upset which might make her sore and so she's chewing cardboard?

I could be completely wrong of course so don't worry. If she's eating and acting okay then it's probably not that.
Thank you. The build up is right at the gums at the top and bottom incisors. You have to lift her lips right back to even be able to see it - which she absolutely hates and won't tolerate me doing it myself. It's as if a little pocket has formed at the gums and food is getting stuck in there. I'm happy clearing it for now but there must be a reason it's happening in the first place

The thing with the cardboard is that she's never shown an interest in chewing it before so it's worrying me that she's obsessed with it now.

Complete mystery :hmm:
 

furryfriends (TEAS)

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This usually happens when there is an incisor issue. This can be an incisor root abscess that is discharging some pus, or an incisor that has become thickened or infected in some way. If the teeth are fine, there is no reason for food to collect around them. The only other reason I can think of is maybe an oral thrush.
 

Beans&Toast

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This usually happens when there is an incisor issue. This can be an incisor root abscess that is discharging some pus, or an incisor that has become thickened or infected in some way. If the teeth are fine, there is no reason for food to collect around them. The only other reason I can think of is maybe an oral thrush.
Thanks for replying I know how busy you are.
With regards to the collection of food at the gums, It's almost like the gums have formed a little pocket that the gunk is filling up into.. if that makes sense.

They did say an x-ray was taken and they're not seeing any root issues etc, nor can they feel any along the jaw.

I've noticed since Toast came back home that she is struggling to bite into pepper with her incisors - an issue she didn't have before the vets today. They didn't touch her teeth though so I'm assuming pain from having her mouth played about with?

She's back at them on Wednesday for a check up, I'll mention what you've said
 

Pound Shilling & Pig

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She could have a root abscess that is brewing but not yet showing on xray. If she can't bite into her pepper this suggests it is painful to bite and ties in with what others have said.

If your vet agrees she may have an infection or abscess brewing, zithromax would be the best antibiotic to use.
 

Beans&Toast

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She could have a root abscess that is brewing but not yet showing on xray. If she can't bite into her pepper this suggests it is painful to bite and ties in with what others have said.

If your vet agrees she may have an infection or abscess brewing, zithromax would be the best antibiotic to use.
Thank you. I'm meant to have a nurse appointment on Wednesday to clear her teeth but I'll change this to the vet and discuss this. How long would a root access take to show up? Whether on x-ray or physical examination?
 
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