Boar Chasing - How much is too much?

a213jf

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Hello,
I have two bonded boars who are just over 3 years old. Trying to add a third to the mix (Fabio, ~6 months old). The introductions went well. The dominant pig (Boe) did his thing and was good to go. His bonded mate (Joey) was relatively subdued during the initial introductions. After a nap and a clean cage (CC cage, bottom is 3grids x 5 grids and top part is 2grids x3grids), we move them in together with three cardboard boxes (no igloos!) Now Joey, is constantly chasing the new guy (Fabio) around. Fabio continues to run away. This has been going on for several hours now, quite nerve wrecking. Poor guy cant seem to sleep or eat because he's constantly being chased. There is no teeth-chattering or otherwise aggressive behavior between Joey and Fabio.

Joey has also been rumbling, chasing and trying to mount Boe more than normal, is this because the hormones are flowing? Thank you in advance for any insight on whats going on or what to do.
 

Piggies&buns

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Unfortunately, the situation will never improve. You cannot keep three boars together. The most you can have is two. You run the risk of ruining the relationship between your two original boars. The best thing to do is remove the new boar, put him in a separate cage with a friend of his own. I know this isn’t the news you wanted to hear, but I am afraid three boars fogefner just doesn’t work.
 

Betsy

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There are exceptions to every rule. It is very rare though that 3 boars do get on I think @Reenie has 3 boars in together but it is more than likely that 3 boys will fight.
 

VickiA

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I'm sorry to be the bearer of bad tidings. It is almost certainly never going to improve and is likely to escalate.
The general rule with boars is that if you have a bonded pair you are doing well and should do nothing to disturb it.
A boar trio rarely works. I'm not saying it never works, but it is most unlikely to work. In the right hands, with the right personalities it can sometimes work. But you will find that this is in older piggies (none of 6 months) and with hugely experienced keepers.
If you had chosen an older boar (over 18 months) or a baby (under 6 weeks) then you might have improved your chances. I would still have advised against it. As it is, you have added a boar at the very worst stage developmentally (he has hit his hormonal teens and won't calm down for up to another 6 - 12 months). He can't help his age or his hormones.
The situation could well deteriorate very rapidly and end in injury. You could irreparably damage the relationship between your 2 bonded boars. Worst case scenario - you will end up with 3 injured boars requiring vet treatment and none can live together.
I would recommend that you remove the newcomer as soon as possible, separate him and find him a companion of his own. And hopefully the bond between Joey and Boe will survive this interruption.
 

Reenie

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Hi, as everyone has said, three is usually a crowd with boars. I have theories on why mine have managed to buck the odds. Firstly, one is very laid back, and friends with both of the others; secondly they have a huge cage where they can all get away from each other (and do); thirdly, even with both these things in place, it probably wouldn't have worked as an introduction, they have been together since birth, so they have been used to being together, and I believe that means they are just more used to each other (being together all their lives isn't a guarantee that piggies will get on though, that's all about personalities). Without the calming influence of Little Dude, the other two would probably not even work as a pair. Even so, they have had several spats when I thought I was going to have to split them, and I still keep grids on standby in case it all goes south.
 

Wiebke

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Hello,
I have two bonded boars who are just over 3 years old. Trying to add a third to the mix (Fabio, ~6 months old). The introductions went well. The dominant pig (Boe) did his thing and was good to go. His bonded mate (Joey) was relatively subdued during the initial introductions. After a nap and a clean cage (CC cage, bottom is 3grids x 5 grids and top part is 2grids x3grids), we move them in together with three cardboard boxes (no igloos!) Now Joey, is constantly chasing the new guy (Fabio) around. Fabio continues to run away. This has been going on for several hours now, quite nerve wrecking. Poor guy cant seem to sleep or eat because he's constantly being chased. There is no teeth-chattering or otherwise aggressive behavior between Joey and Fabio.

Joey has also been rumbling, chasing and trying to mount Boe more than normal, is this because the hormones are flowing? Thank you in advance for any insight on whats going on or what to do.
Hi!

Please take the time to read these guides here. Keep in mind that trios are one of the most tricky constellation in guinea pigs; more fail than not - and the rate of failure is is going up quickly the more sub-adults there are. 3 teenage boars have a fail rate of around 90%.
Introducing a teenager at the time when their testosterone level is at a life time high is frankly very much on the fraught side.
Please consider whether it wouldn't be better to keep the new boy as a nextdoor companion and eventually find him his own character compatible mate by rescue dating (if that is an option for you). Boars are definitely best in a pair.
Adding More Guinea Pigs Or Merging Pairs – What Works And What Not?
Bonding: Illustrated Dominance Behaviours And Dynamics
Boars: Teenage, Bullying, Fighting, Fall-outs And What Next?
Boars: A guide to successful companionship.
 
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