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Is This A Safe Probiotic?

Shelby._.

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#1
So my guinea pig is on antibiotics and I've been giving him smashed up healthy guinea pig poo as a probiotic. As I was scrolling around on the website I order most of my pet supplies off of I came across this product. Has anyone ever used it or do you think it is ok to use? I'm asking because incase I ever have to have someone look after my guinea pigs while they are on antibiotics I would like to have something besides the "more natural" option available. Thank you!
IMG_4089.PNG IMG_4088.PNG
 

Cavy Kung-Fu

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#2
I don't know about the ingredients but sprinkling it on food isn't the best way to do it as you don't know how much (if any) they end up consuming.

I use Pro C which is something you mix with water. It's best to syringe it so you know how much they're getting but if it's someone who's looking after them and can't do that you could put some in a bottle if they like it (if they don't remove immediately in case it stops them drinking), my lot drink more if I put the Pro C in the bottle :))

All I need to do is put the mix with water in a syringe and the piggies take it willingly. It seems pretty natural to be fair and ends up a green colour due to plant material I believe. My lot love it anyway!
 

Shelby._.

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#3
I don't know about the ingredients but sprinkling it on food isn't the best way to do it as you don't know how much (if any) they end up consuming.

I use Pro C which is something you mix with water. It's best to syringe it so you know how much they're getting but if it's someone who's looking after them and can't do that you could put some in a bottle if they like it (if they don't remove immediately in case it stops them drinking), my lot drink more if I put the Pro C in the bottle :))

All I need to do is put the mix with water in a syringe and the piggies take it willingly. It seems pretty natural to be fair and ends up a green colour due to plant material I believe. My lot love it anyway!
Where do you get that? And thank you!
 

Cavy Kung-Fu

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#4
No problem! :) I've only found it at P@H in the UK so far, where abouts are you based? It'll be easier to help if you pop your location on your profile for future too :)
 

Wiebke

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#5
Probiotics are pretty much the same and these days available in many pet shop, epsecially chain ones. Ideally you syringe them mixed into 1 ml of water to make sure that a piggy really eats them; I have had a few that would happily nibble their favourite veg all around the powder but not touch the probiotic!

If you have a guinea pig with total loss of appetite from an antibiotic (which can happen with any) or with severe or ongoing digestive problems, a probiotic or poo soup may not be enough; they are only very mild non-medication support whose effectiveness is still questioned by many vets.
In these more extreme cases I have made good experiences with fibreplex, which is a lot more effective - whether that is an adverse reaction to an antibiotic, GI stasis, diarrhoea or bloat. It is something that is well worth having in your first aid kit, especially if you have a frailer or older guinea pig.
Probiotics, Recovery Foods And Vitamin C: Overview With Product Links
 

Shelby._.

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#6
Where do you get that? And thank you!
I don't know about the ingredients but sprinkling it on food isn't the best way to do it as you don't know how much (if any) they end up consuming.

I use Pro C which is something you mix with water. It's best to syringe it so you know how much they're getting but if it's someone who's looking after them and can't do that you could put some in a bottle if they like it (if they don't remove immediately in case it stops them drinking), my lot drink more if I put the Pro C in the bottle :))

All I need to do is put the mix with water in a syringe and the piggies take it willingly. It seems pretty natural to be fair and ends up a green colour due to plant material I believe. My lot love it anyway!
No problem! :) I've only found it at P@H in the UK so far, where abouts are you based? It'll be easier to help if you pop your location on your profile for future too :)
I'm in the US. I’ll have to update my settings :)
 

Shelby._.

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#8
Probiotics are pretty much the same and these days available in many pet shop, epsecially chain ones. Ideally you syringe them mixed into 1 ml of water to make sure that a piggy really eats them; I have had a few that would happily nibble their favourite veg all around the powder but not touch the probiotic!

If you have a guinea pig with total loss of appetite from an antibiotic (which can happen with any) or with severe or ongoing digestive problems, a probiotic or poo soup may not be enough; they are only very mild non-medication support whose effectiveness is still questioned by many vets.
In these more extreme cases I have made good experiences with fibreplex, which is a lot more effective - whether that is an adverse reaction to an antibiotic, GI stasis, diarrhoea or bloat. It is something that is well worth having in your first aid kit, especially if you have a frailer or older guinea pig.
Probiotics, Recovery Foods And Vitamin C: Overview With Product Links
Thank you! I haven’t seen a loss in appetite in my piggie but I will keep an eye out. I usually give him some veg after to make sure all the medicine goes down.
 

Wiebke

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#9
Thank you! I haven’t seen a loss in appetite in my piggie but I will keep an eye out. I usually give him some veg after to make sure all the medicine goes down.
Contrary of what you see online, the vast majority of antibiotics doesn't cause any problems whatsoever and doesn't need any extra support. The issue with online research is that it is usually a misrepresentation because success cases do mostly go unreported.

Syringe a guinea pig the same amount of an undiluted vitamin C rich berry cordial (UK brand: ribena) after an antibiotic they really don't like (like baytril, which has the most horrible taste - but please don't try; it is not good for humans). That will do the trick nicely to cover up the bad taste and gives them an extra vitamin C boost all in one.

If you syringe properly, i.e. through the gap between front and back teeth and never more than 0.3-0.5 ml at once (i.e. 1 mouthful), you need not worry about things coming back out. Rodents don't have a vomit reflex; what has gone down can only come out the other end.
 

Shelby._.

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#10
Contrary of what you see online, the vast majority of antibiotics doesn't cause any problems whatsoever and doesn't need any extra support. The issue with online research is that it is usually a misrepresentation because success cases do mostly go unreported.

Syringe a guinea pig the same amount of an undiluted vitamin C rich berry cordial (UK brand: ribena) after an antibiotic they really don't like (like baytril, which has the most horrible taste - but please don't try; it is not good for humans). That will do the trick nicely to cover up the bad taste and gives them an extra vitamin C boost all in one.

If you syringe properly, i.e. through the gap between front and back teeth and never more than 0.3-0.5 ml at once (i.e. 1 mouthful), you need not worry about things coming back out. Rodents don't have a vomit reflex; what has gone down can only come out the other end.
Thank you! Oliver thankfully takes his medicine very well. Thanks for always responding so quickly! It is very appreciated:)
 
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