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URI recovery

Aurory

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#1
Hi all!

Recently my guinea pig Gingerlily has come down with a URI. I was quick to act and booked in a vet appointment the next day where she was given an antibiotic jab which lasts 10 days and an anti inflammatory. She picked up an appetite and began to act normal that night, however seemed to go back to being hutched over, drooling, puffed up and hooting/grunting. I took her back and the vet gave her another anti inflammatory and a steroid jab which was to encourage her appetite. Unfortunately, I don't think either helped too much but she is still active when I put her on the floor, she will run back to her house and is still somewhat active in her home. She's responding still, however still drooling and has crusty eyes and she won't eat and I don't know if she's been drinking.

Unfortunately, I don't have a syringe to assist her in eating or drinking so I was wondering if anybody here is able to offer me advice on helping her the best I can to survive because I'm terrified to lose my baby and her sister wouldn't take it well at all. I have tried offering her favourite foods and water, I've had her outside for grass and she somewhat perked up and I think she may have nibbled at a bit, however I'm scared this won't sustain her. Any advice would really help me as I'm at sixth form/college nearly full time during the day and constantly worry I'll come home to her gone. I've done all I can with vets but I don't think he can offer her anything else, so all I can do is try to encourage eating/drinking.

Thank you :)

Side note: She's quite a large guinea pig, 1.4kgs and nearly 2 years old if that's any use to anyone!
 

Wiebke

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#2
Hi all!

Recently my guinea pig Gingerlily has come down with a URI. I was quick to act and booked in a vet appointment the next day where she was given an antibiotic jab which lasts 10 days and an anti inflammatory. She picked up an appetite and began to act normal that night, however seemed to go back to being hutched over, drooling, puffed up and hooting/grunting. I took her back and the vet gave her another anti inflammatory and a steroid jab which was to encourage her appetite. Unfortunately, I don't think either helped too much but she is still active when I put her on the floor, she will run back to her house and is still somewhat active in her home. She's responding still, however still drooling and has crusty eyes and she won't eat and I don't know if she's been drinking.

Unfortunately, I don't have a syringe to assist her in eating or drinking so I was wondering if anybody here is able to offer me advice on helping her the best I can to survive because I'm terrified to lose my baby and her sister wouldn't take it well at all. I have tried offering her favourite foods and water, I've had her outside for grass and she somewhat perked up and I think she may have nibbled at a bit, however I'm scared this won't sustain her. Any advice would really help me as I'm at sixth form/college nearly full time during the day and constantly worry I'll come home to her gone. I've done all I can with vets but I don't think he can offer her anything else, so all I can do is try to encourage eating/drinking.

Thank you :)

Side note: She's quite a large guinea pig, 1.4kgs and nearly 2 years old if that's any use to anyone!
Hi! You can use the medication syringe or a get a needle-free 1 ml syringe from a pharmacy yourself. Cut off the tip and plunger as shown in the syringe feeding guide with a pair of scissors to allow the fibre to come through.

In an emergency you can always mush up pellets and feed those. Please read the illustrated guide; we have written it specifically for inexperienced people. It should hopefully answer all your questions.
We have also included advice for what you can do with things you have at home or easily available in an emergency.
Complete Syringe Feeding Guide

In the longer term, it is very useful to order some syringes online, as well as recovery formula powder and probiotics. Emergencies never happen at a convienent time in my own experience. :(
First Aid Kit For Guinea Pigs

New Owners' Problem Solver And Information Collection
 

Qualcast&Flymo

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#3
I'm sorry your piggy is poorly. Hope you are able to get her to eat more with the advice above and that she perks up more. I saw you said the vet had given her a steroid jab - as I understand it, guinea pigs generally shouldn't be given steroids and they probably don't help. Isn't that correct @Wiebke ? I don't know if they can make matters worse, but they are best avoided.
The Problems With Steroids And Why They Shouldn't Be Used.
 

Aurory

New Born Pup
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Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK
#5
Update: I've given her some water filled with vitamin solution (I think it's vit-min the Johnsons stuff) and attempted to syringe her mushed up pellets which didn't go too well because of the consistency of the pellets and the width of the syringe. She wriggled quite a bit but took it like a champ, seems a bit better from earlier. She attempted a mint leaf but started to spasm and tilt her head around funny (I'm guessing adjusting her throat or something) before refusing it again. I'll try again in a few hours with more fluids and attempt the pellets mush again to see if she'll take it from the syringe or my finger. Then more before bed which might help. Thank you all very much for the help and best wishes, hopefully she will feel better soon. She's fighting her best.
 

Wiebke

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#6
Update: I've given her some water filled with vitamin solution (I think it's vit-min the Johnsons stuff) and attempted to syringe her mushed up pellets which didn't go too well because of the consistency of the pellets and the width of the syringe. She wriggled quite a bit but took it like a champ, seems a bit better from earlier. She attempted a mint leaf but started to spasm and tilt her head around funny (I'm guessing adjusting her throat or something) before refusing it again. I'll try again in a few hours with more fluids and attempt the pellets mush again to see if she'll take it from the syringe or my finger. Then more before bed which might help. Thank you all very much for the help and best wishes, hopefully she will feel better soon. She's fighting her best.
Have you cut off the syringe tip and plunger just below where the syringe widens? Otherwise it will not work! mix the feed with a little more water if necessary until the fibre (comes through). It is generally easier with fine grind recovery formula as that is designed to go through a syringe tip.

Please make sure that you get fibre into her. Water is just not enough to keep the gut going. I am very sorry, but it is going to be a real fight round the clock, getting little into her but often. You are aiming at 40-60 ml of fibre in 24 hours or as close as you can get to keep the guts going. It is hard and very draining as every little bit is going to be a fight.

If she refuses and struggles in clear excess of her weakened state, then it is likely that her body is no longer able to process any feed and is closing down.

All the best!
 
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