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Bladder stone?

Jasmine-sleeps

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Hi guys,

Sorry to be that annoying newbie immediately looking for advice. I found this on my pigs bed today, it looks like a weird poo with calcium deposits around it. The stone looking bit was like soft grit. I know its relatively normal for pigs to excrete excess calcium through urine, but this looks concerning. I’ve noticed some irregularities in the shape of the poos (not many, but some) and more white staining this week from the calcium wees on their blanket than usual. Can anyone please advise me as to whether this is a ASAP vet appointment issue, or something I can resolve with changes to their diets?

I'm really worried about this, especially with everything going on at the moment and the fact that I'm only able to go to the vets as a last resort as I live with people in a high risk group.

Just as a background they have Haybox Timothy hay (changed from Oxbow about one/two weeks ago,) Oxbow pellets, and veges twice daily (loosely based on the rate watchers diet with nothing too high in calcium).

Thank you in advance for anyone who can give me some help with this 😊
 

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Wiebke

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Hi guys,

Sorry to be that annoying newbie immediately looking for advice. I found this on my pigs bed today, it looks like a weird poo with calcium deposits around it. The stone looking bit was like soft grit. I know its relatively normal for pigs to excrete excess calcium through urine, but this looks concerning. I’ve noticed some irregularities in the shape of the poos (not many, but some) and more white staining this week from the calcium wees on their blanket than usual. Can anyone please advise me as to whether this is a ASAP vet appointment issue, or something I can resolve with changes to their diets?

I'm really worried about this, especially with everything going on at the moment and the fact that I'm only able to go to the vets as a last resort as I live with people in a high risk group.

Just as a background they have Haybox Timothy hay (changed from Oxbow about one/two weeks ago,) Oxbow pellets, and veges twice daily (loosely based on the rate watchers diet with nothing too high in calcium).

Thank you in advance for anyone who can give me some help with this 😊
Hi!

Most people forget that the UK is a mostly hard water country and that even low calcium pellets contain more calcium than the richest veg. Please filter your water and restrict pellets to 1 tablespoon per piggy per day.
Long Term Balanced General And Special Needs Guinea Pig Diets

Keep in mind that dietary changes take several weeks to come through as the calcium absorption process is a slow one.

You need to see vet if you notice any straining and vocalisation when peeing or pooing and promptly if your boy is showing signs of being in pain, there is actual bleeding or as a life and death emergency if he is suddenly looking very ill and off his food (in this case a stone may have got stuck in the awkward inglenook in his urethra and blocking the urine flow). Right now, just keep monitoring his weight and give him his usual body check. It is impossible for us to whether this has come from the bladder or his boar bits.
Boar Care: Bits, Bums & Baths
Weight - Monitoring and Management
 

Jasmine-sleeps

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Hi!

Most people forget that the UK is a mostly hard water country and that even low calcium pellets contain more calcium than the richest veg. Please filter your water and restrict pellets to 1 tablespoon per piggy per day.
Long Term Balanced General And Special Needs Guinea Pig Diets

Keep in mind that dietary changes take several weeks to come through as the calcium absorption process is a slow one.

You need to see vet if you notice any straining and vocalisation when peeing or pooing and promptly if your boy is showing signs of being in pain, there is actual bleeding or as a life and death emergency if he is suddenly looking very ill and off his food (in this case a stone may have got stuck in the awkward inglenook in his urethra and blocking the urine flow). Right now, just keep monitoring his weight and give him his usual body check. It is impossible for us to whether this has come from the bladder or his boar bits.
Boar Care: Bits, Bums & Baths
Weight - Monitoring and Management
Hi Wiebke,

I honestly can’t thank you enough for your helpful and very quick response! I will make those changes as of today and hopefully notice a difference! I’ve been so careful with other things and yet never even thought about the water, so thanks for that 😁

They both seem to be behaving normally at the moment, and eating, weeing and pooing normally other that what I said above. So thank you for the reassurance that they’re okay for now, I tend to worry a bit too much about them sometimes! Just to say though, they are sows not boars, does this make a difference?

Thanks again so much!
 

VickiA

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I agree with Wiebke’s advice (as ever). If they are sows and they were to have stones the prognosis is actually better than if they were boars (to do with anatomy). But hopefully there aren’t any stones.
 

Jasmine-sleeps

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I agree with Wiebke’s advice (as ever). If they are sows and they were to have stones the prognosis is actually better than if they were boars (to do with anatomy). But hopefully there aren’t any stones.
Hi Vicki,

Thank you for your response! That’s good to hear, I hope there aren’t any either. I’ll follow the advice, and keep an eye out for any of the signs mentioned by Wiebke. But fingers crossed! 😊

Thanks again both, you’ve saved me a lot of worry and an unnecessary trip to the vets during this time!
 
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