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Boars fighting, blood drawn

xobluecrayon

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Hi, I’m not sure if this is the right thread to post this in so my apologies if it’s not. Anyway, we got one male guinea pig from a pet store 5 months ago (he seemed pretty young) then 2 weeks later we went to get a bonding service done and we found another male match (according to the rescue this guy was 1 year+). Anyway they’ve been living together since then (so for 5 months now) it’s been dandy. Last week when we came home we noticed something off. The older one seemed scared of the younger one and every time they were near each other they would teeth chatter forever! No blood was drawn so we rode it out. Things seemed to get better with only teeth chatters here and there and it seemed to be back to normal until last night before my boyfriend went to bed he sent me a picture and he thinks the younger one bit the older one and blood was drawn! I’ve read so many forums that said once blood is drawn they need to be separated forever, but it seems like those were newly bonded pairs. Does it matter that ours have lived peacefully together for 5 months before this? Can we separate them by putting separate cages next to each other and see how they interact before trying to make them live together again? We think the little one is still going through puberty, will it make a difference once he’s done? I’m just confused and stressed because I saw one video from the LA Guinea Pig Rescue where he was trying to bond two boys and one of them bit the other’s wiener and drew blood, but he still kept them together and kept trying. So I don’t know if there’s hope for my two boys, I don’t want the older one to be scared or hurt again. Please help, thank you
 

Wiebke

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Hi, I’m not sure if this is the right thread to post this in so my apologies if it’s not. Anyway, we got one male guinea pig from a pet store 5 months ago (he seemed pretty young) then 2 weeks later we went to get a bonding service done and we found another male match (according to the rescue this guy was 1 year+). Anyway they’ve been living together since then (so for 5 months now) it’s been dandy. Last week when we came home we noticed something off. The older one seemed scared of the younger one and every time they were near each other they would teeth chatter forever! No blood was drawn so we rode it out. Things seemed to get better with only teeth chatters here and there and it seemed to be back to normal until last night before my boyfriend went to bed he sent me a picture and he thinks the younger one bit the older one and blood was drawn! I’ve read so many forums that said once blood is drawn they need to be separated forever, but it seems like those were newly bonded pairs. Does it matter that ours have lived peacefully together for 5 months before this? Can we separate them by putting separate cages next to each other and see how they interact before trying to make them live together again? We think the little one is still going through puberty, will it make a difference once he’s done? I’m just confused and stressed because I saw one video from the LA Guinea Pig Rescue where he was trying to bond two boys and one of them bit the other’s wiener and drew blood, but he still kept them together and kept trying. So I don’t know if there’s hope for my two boys, I don’t want the older one to be scared or hurt again. Please help, thank you
Hi!

Please separate your teenagers at the height of their life-long hormone output; it is the typical age for experiences like yours. Once there has been a full-on intentional bite (and not just a misjudged back leg swipe), boars won't go back together. I am personally very unhappy about the Los Angeles video.

Please take the time to read the two guides below. They are very practical and detailed and take you through all aspects that are in play:
Boars: Teenage, Bullying, Fighting, Fall-outs And What Next?
A Comprehensive Guide to Guinea Pig Boars
Dominance Behaviours In Guinea Pigs
A Comprehensive Guide to Guinea Pig Boars
 

xobluecrayon

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Hi!

Please separate your teenagers at the height of their life-long hormone output; it is the typical age for experiences like yours. Once there has been a full-on intentional bite (and not just a misjudged back leg swipe), boars won't go back together. I am personally very unhappy about the Los Angeles video.

Please take the time to read the two guides below. They are very practical and detailed and take you through all aspects that are in play:
Boars: Teenage, Bullying, Fighting, Fall-outs And What Next?
A Comprehensive Guide to Guinea Pig Boars
Dominance Behaviours In Guinea Pigs
A Comprehensive Guide to Guinea Pig Boars
Thank you very much for your response and for the resources. I will definitely check them out.
 
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