• UK storm warning - Danger of unseasonal high winds and falling trees! Please secure any hutches and sheds, and bring your guinea pigs and rabbits indoors if possible! Click Here for info

Cage Mate After Death?

xkellyrose11x

New Born Pup
Joined
Oct 30, 2017
Messages
6
Reaction score
9
Points
70
My Guinea Pig has recently died and now her cage mate is all alone. I have two male Guinea Pigs in a separate cage, and the now single female in a rabbit hutch. She is two years old. I know Guinea Pigs should be in groups. Should I get a new cage mate for the female, and if so how old? (Planning to adopt). Is the fact that the female can socialize through talking to the other two males enough?

Rest In Peace my beautiful Ginger, your paw prints are forever left on my heart.
 

Wiebke

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Mar 10, 2009
Messages
66,376
Reaction score
32,583
Points
3,456
Location
Coventry UK
My Guinea Pig has recently died and now her cage mate is all alone. I have two male Guinea Pigs in a separate cage, and the now single female in a rabbit hutch. She is two years old. I know Guinea Pigs should be in groups. Should I get a new cage mate for the female, and if so how old? (Planning to adopt). Is the fact that the female can socialize through talking to the other two males enough?

Rest In Peace my beautiful Ginger, your paw prints are forever left on my heart.
Hi!

I am very sorry for your loss. You are welcome to post a tribute to Ginger in our Rainbow Bridge section if and whenever if feels right for you.

Please find your bereaved girl a new sow or neutered boar mate of any age - ideally by dating her at a rescue that offers this service, so your girl can choose who she wants for a stable and loving relationship, and you come home with a healthy/quarantined, guaranteed not pregnant new friend only if acceptance has happened at the rescue. Mutual liking comes way before any other consideration like age, gender or looks. ;)
Just hearing other guinea pigs is not enough for the long term, especially as she is still young.
You can find rescue links and more tips via this guide here: Looking After A Bereaved Guinea Pig
 

xkellyrose11x

New Born Pup
Joined
Oct 30, 2017
Messages
6
Reaction score
9
Points
70
Thank you so much for the detailed reply! It is very helpful in aiding in the health of my Guinea Pig. I have been monitoring her weight, keeping a close eye on her behavior and appetite, and also giving her much more attention. She has been doing well, but don’t want to rush her grieving process by getting a new piggy suddenly. How long should I wait to get her a new cage mate? I don’t want her to be alone for too long, but don’t want to rush.
 

xkellyrose11x

New Born Pup
Joined
Oct 30, 2017
Messages
6
Reaction score
9
Points
70
Hi!

I am very sorry for your loss. You are welcome to post a tribute to Ginger in our Rainbow Bridge section if and whenever if feels right for you.

Please find your bereaved girl a new sow or neutered boar mate of any age - ideally by dating her at a rescue that offers this service, so your girl can choose who she wants for a stable and loving relationship, and you come home with a healthy/quarantined, guaranteed not pregnant new friend only if acceptance has happened at the rescue. Mutual liking comes way before any other consideration like age, gender or looks. ;)
Just hearing other guinea pigs is not enough for the long term, especially as she is still young.
You can find rescue links and more tips via this guide here: Looking After A Bereaved Guinea Pig
Hi!

I am very sorry for your loss. You are welcome to post a tribute to Ginger in our Rainbow Bridge section if and whenever if feels right for you.

Please find your bereaved girl a new sow or neutered boar mate of any age - ideally by dating her at a rescue that offers this service, so your girl can choose who she wants for a stable and loving relationship, and you come home with a healthy/quarantined, guaranteed not pregnant new friend only if acceptance has happened at the rescue. Mutual liking comes way before any other consideration like age, gender or looks. ;)
Just hearing other guinea pigs is not enough for the long term, especially as she is still young.
You can find rescue links and more tips via this guide here: Looking After A Bereaved Guinea Pig
Thank you so much for the detailed reply! It is very helpful in aiding in the health of my Guinea Pig. I have been monitoring her weight, keeping a close eye on her behavior and appetite, and also giving her much more attention. She has been doing well, but don’t want to rush her grieving process by getting a new piggy suddenly. How long should I wait to get her a new cage mate? I don’t want her to be alone for too long, but don’t want to rush.
 

Wiebke

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Mar 10, 2009
Messages
66,376
Reaction score
32,583
Points
3,456
Location
Coventry UK
Thank you so much for the detailed reply! It is very helpful in aiding in the health of my Guinea Pig. I have been monitoring her weight, keeping a close eye on her behavior and appetite, and also giving her much more attention. She has been doing well, but don’t want to rush her grieving process by getting a new piggy suddenly. How long should I wait to get her a new cage mate? I don’t want her to be alone for too long, but don’t want to rush.
If you can, please ring round any good rescues within your reach now to see whether they have any suitable guinea pigs to date with your girl. That usually takes a few days as rescue people are always very busy. ;)
If you cannot rescue date, consider looking for a younger sow, but take into consideration that you may need to quarantine for 2-3 weeks if she comes from a place that does not have a mandatory quarantine (i.e. shop, breeder piggies or private intakes).
I generally prefer to have a new friend within 2-4 weeks of bereavement; sooner, in a matter of 1-3 days, if a guinea pig is not eating. it usually depends on how soon and where can I line up a new date. Ideally I try to start with a place that has got a choice of 2-3 potential mates for my bereaved piggy to meet to see where there is most initial interest on first sniff and take it from there. That has usually resulted in a very happy new relationship.

Rescues usually have got guinea pigs of varying ages and very often ex-pets; I have had two widows of comparable age just moving in with each with minimum fuss. The survivor of this new bond (who was acutely pining, so we had to drive a bit further to a rescue that had some suitable recently neutered boars) - but it was love on first sniff with the third boar she was introduced to through the grids pre-bonding.
I have travelled for 2 hours on the train each way if necessary in order to date piggies of mine if finding the right match was crucial and am currently on the search for the right mate for my latest arrival, a sow that obviously has never lived with guinea pigs before and has interaction/bonding issues. That way, I am not in any danger of ending up with a piggy that doesn't work out, so it is in my own experience well worth the effort.
 

xkellyrose11x

New Born Pup
Joined
Oct 30, 2017
Messages
6
Reaction score
9
Points
70
Update: Truffle has a new friend! She was adopted and is named Clementine, and they get along wonderfully. Thank you for the advice, it definitely ended well with two happy piggies and a happy Ginger looking down from heaven

B0A10C84-6621-4BFA-9242-AE848C783516.jpeg
 

xkellyrose11x

New Born Pup
Joined
Oct 30, 2017
Messages
6
Reaction score
9
Points
70
Thank you everyone! Truffle is the black piggie with a white ring, and Clementine is tri-color with the black spot on her eye! They quickly became best friends ❤
 
Top