Friend for my pig?

SydneySharkk

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Hi, this is my first post on here so I hope I’m doing this right. I have a female pig named Piggy, I adopted her about two months ago from a classmate who couldn’t take care of her anymore, she told me she was about 2.5 years old and they “rescued” her from someone before them. I got the standard small cage and some other things along with her (I’m building her a larger 2 story cage, it’s almost finished) I knew even before I got her from doing research about guinea pigs that the most important thing for them is to have a friend, so I’m kind of stuck right now. I’ve brought this up to my parents a few times but they usually just brush it aside, I was surprised when they agreed to getting her in the first place. I’m just worried that even if I somehow convince them to let me get another one, that they might not get along, then what do I do? I also live in a small town, and there’s rarely any guinea pigs, or any animal for that matter, up for adoption, you can get them from the petstore, but id rather not do that. I also wouldn’t want a baby, it would have to be a female around her age. I just don’t really know what to do, I’ll have the room for another pig once I’m done building the new cage, but I’m just really worried that they would fight. I can tell she’s been with other pigs from the marks on her ear, any advice?3B9CD4F9-F639-4FF8-917F-766E0A3187CF.jpeg
 

Wiebke

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Hi, this is my first post on here so I hope I’m doing this right. I have a female pig named Piggy, I adopted her about two months ago from a classmate who couldn’t take care of her anymore, she told me she was about 2.5 years old and they “rescued” her from someone before them. I got the standard small cage and some other things along with her (I’m building her a larger 2 story cage, it’s almost finished) I knew even before I got her from doing research about guinea pigs that the most important thing for them is to have a friend, so I’m kind of stuck right now. I’ve brought this up to my parents a few times but they usually just brush it aside, I was surprised when they agreed to getting her in the first place. I’m just worried that even if I somehow convince them to let me get another one, that they might not get along, then what do I do? I also live in a small town, and there’s rarely any guinea pigs, or any animal for that matter, up for adoption, you can get them from the petstore, but id rather not do that. I also wouldn’t want a baby, it would have to be a female around her age. I just don’t really know what to do, I’ll have the room for another pig once I’m done building the new cage, but I’m just really worried that they would fight. I can tell she’s been with other pigs from the marks on her ear, any advice?View attachment 106087
Hi and welcome

It is great that you want to find your girl a friend. Please consider that she may not bond with a piggy you bring home, so make sure that you can divide your cage and keep them as next door neighbours with interaction and ongoing stimulation through the grids. That is usually the best alternative if you can't let your own piggy choose who they like and want to live with.
Mutual liking comes long before age. You can look at both sows and de-sexed boars as possible options. I would strongly recommend to keep an open mind when your options are limited. We all aim for the best, but in the real world we can only try to come as close as possible. But that is enough. How much we can do often depends on where we live and how good our rescue and vet access is. Not everybody has it or can easily travel for hours to get to a good rescue (although when you can, then it is definitely worth it!)

I assume that you are from the US?

If you do not have any of the good standard rescues within your reach, you could try petfinder. They also have a list of rescues, but unlike the recommended and carefully vetted rescues on Guinea Lynx, many will not provide a quarantine or medical care (you have to ask yourself as there are all shades out there, including euthanising/no medical care shelters in the US); the same goes for any private intakes from the free-ads. Always double check the gender yourself before bringing a new piggy home and be aware that people who are keen to get rid of a guinea pig will lie through teeth or not mention any major problems. Make sure that you have the money to pay for any necessary vet care yourself before you get another guinea pig. You have more customer rights protection with a pet shop chain, I am very reluctant to point out.

Please take the time to read these links here; you will hopefully find them very helpful.
Recommended good standard non-kill US rescues with quarantine/vet care and pregnancy watch. Only healthy and correctly sexed piggies are put up for adoption: Guinea Lynx :: US Guinea Pig Rescue and Shelter Organizations
What to look out for in any guinea pigs that do not come from a recommended rescue.
What to check and look out for in new guinea pigs (vet checks, sexing, parasites&illness)

Adding More Guinea Pigs Or Merging Pairs – What Works And What Not?
Bonding and Interaction: Illustrated social behaviours and bonding dynamics
Sow Behaviour (including ovarian cysts)

All the best! And good to ask before you get a piggy that comes with problems!
 

SydneySharkk

Junior Guinea Pig
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Hi and welcome

It is great that you want to find your girl a friend. Please consider that she may not bond with a piggy you bring home, so make sure that you can divide your cage and keep them as next door neighbours with interaction and ongoing stimulation through the grids. That is usually the best alternative if you can't let your own piggy choose who they like and want to live with.
Mutual liking comes long before age. You can look at both sows and de-sexed boars as possible options. I would strongly recommend to keep an open mind when your options are limited. We all aim for the best, but in the real world we can only try to come as close as possible. But that is enough. How much we can do often depends on where we live and how good our rescue and vet access is. Not everybody has it or can easily travel for hours to get to a good rescue (although when you can, then it is definitely worth it!)

I assume that you are from the US?

If you do not have any of the good standard rescues within your reach, you could try petfinder. They also have a list of rescues, but unlike the recommended and carefully vetted rescues on Guinea Lynx, many will not provide a quarantine or medical care (you have to ask yourself as there are all shades out there, including euthanising/no medical care shelters in the US); the same goes for any private intakes from the free-ads. Always double check the gender yourself before bringing a new piggy home and be aware that people who are keen to get rid of a guinea pig will lie through teeth or not mention any major problems. Make sure that you have the money to pay for any necessary vet care yourself before you get another guinea pig. You have more customer rights protection with a pet shop chain, I am very reluctant to point out.

Please take the time to read these links here; you will hopefully find them very helpful.
Recommended good standard non-kill US rescues with quarantine/vet care and pregnancy watch. Only healthy and correctly sexed piggies are put up for adoption: Guinea Lynx :: US Guinea Pig Rescue and Shelter Organizations
What to look out for in any guinea pigs that do not come from a recommended rescue.
What to check and look out for in new guinea pigs (vet checks, sexing, parasites&illness)

Adding More Guinea Pigs Or Merging Pairs – What Works And What Not?
Bonding and Interaction: Illustrated social behaviours and bonding dynamics
Sow Behaviour (including ovarian cysts)

All the best! And good to ask before you get a piggy that comes with problems!
Thanks for responding! Sorry I didn’t see it until now. I’m from Canada, there is a city 2 hours away from me that has a lot more Guinea pigs available, there’s one shelter I know of there but they currently only have male piggies. I’ve been checking ads online and there is female pigs people are trying to sell there as well. My mom is in love with Piggy, so I think I’m going to have to subtly hint at getting another pig, it was a big change getting her so I might have to wait a while before my family is open to getting another. and if we happen to go to the city and visit the shelter with an adoptable pig... hopefully they will change their minds lol. And thanks for the links!
 
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