Purring in her cage...

BD06BND

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Hi all,
I have joined this forum to get more info and advice about my guinea pig that I've had roughly around 2 weeks. I absolutely adore her and she is extremely sociable. However there are many occasions when she is in her cage that I hear her purring, any suggestions what this could mean? I am aware of the different meanings of a purr but she is making the noise even when I am no where near her cage! Any advice or suggestions would be much appreciated, thank you!
 

sport_billy

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Hello welcome to the forum! Any chance you could video the noise and upload it to YouTube then link to it, hard to tell piggy noises without hearing them.
Is she doing anything when doing it?
 

Wiebke

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Hi all,
I have joined this forum to get more info and advice about my guinea pig that I've had roughly around 2 weeks. I absolutely adore her and she is extremely sociable. However there are many occasions when she is in her cage that I hear her purring, any suggestions what this could mean? I am aware of the different meanings of a purr but she is making the noise even when I am no where near her cage! Any advice or suggestions would be much appreciated, thank you!
Hi and welcome!

A) Is your guinea pig an only guinea pig?
B) Have you double-checked the gender?
What to check and look out for in new guinea pigs (vet checks, sexing, parasites&illness)
 

cavylover2002

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Hello!:wel: to the forum! I hope you are planning on getting another pig of the same sex soon (or a neutered boar), as guinea pigs need to live in pairs in order to be happy/healthy! :)
Guinea pig "purrs" can have different meanings. A deep, relaxed one means your guinea is content, while a higher pitched one is more likely a sound of annoyance. A shorter sounding, apprehensive purr may mean fear however a high pitched sqeak is the typical signal of fear. The most common type of purr you hear is when you hold your cavy and they feel to be vibrating/purring, because they are relaxed! Perhaps your guinea pig may not even be purring, as guinea pigs also hiss, chirp, and rumble.
 

BD06BND

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Hello welcome to the forum! Any chance you could video the noise and upload it to YouTube then link to it, hard to tell piggy noises without hearing them.
Is she doing anything when doing it?
I'll try and get a video link uploaded ASAP, thank you!
 

BD06BND

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Hello!:wel: to the forum! I hope you are planning on getting another pig of the same sex soon (or a neutered boar), as guinea pigs need to live in pairs in order to be happy/healthy! :)
Guinea pig "purrs" can have different meanings. A deep, relaxed one means your guinea is content, while a higher pitched one is more likely a sound of annoyance. A shorter sounding, apprehensive purr may mean fear however a high pitched sqeak is the typical signal of fear. The most common type of purr you hear is when you hold your cavy and they feel to be vibrating/purring, because they are relaxed! Perhaps your guinea pig may not even be purring, as guinea pigs also hiss, chirp, and rumble.
The store that I bought her from actually told me not to get another. She was in the adoption centre as she had been treated for ringworm and when they tried to integrate her back, it wasn't successful. Having read online/ research, I am slightly worried as it does say everywhere to keep them in pairs but the store have still said not to...A little bit stuck, to be honest! Thank you for your reply!
 

BD06BND

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Hi and welcome!

A) Is your guinea pig an only guinea pig?
B) Have you double-checked the gender?
What to check and look out for in new guinea pigs (vet checks, sexing, parasites&illness)
Thank you for the welcome! She is an only guinea pig, yes...(The store that I bought her from actually told me not to get another. She was in the adoption centre as she had been treated for ringworm and when they tried to integrate her back, it wasn't successful. Having read online/ research, I am slightly worried as it does say everywhere to keep them in pairs but the store have still said not to...A little bit stuck, to be honest!). She was originally sold as a boy (her name is Forrest Gump haha) but when the store member was demonstrating a health check, I pointed out the 'nipples' and they then said it was a little girl, I have just found out on this forum that both boys and girls have nipples so I am going to check her downstairs asap!
 

cavylover2002

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The store that I bought her from actually told me not to get another. She was in the adoption centre as she had been treated for ringworm and when they tried to integrate her back, it wasn't successful. Having read online/ research, I am slightly worried as it does say everywhere to keep them in pairs but the store have still said not to...A little bit stuck, to be honest! Thank you for your reply!
If she was treated for ringworm and Is now healthy, you can definitely get another guinea pigs. Pet stores are almost always wrong when it comes to things. They’re wrong when it comes to cages, social ability, sex...etc. I did get my 2nd pig from a store and they told me not to give him a companion and I did. He is the most sociable guinea pig in the world with my other pig and they bonded so well. I highly suggest adding a second pig if she can get along with them! If the pet store did try to integrate her, they might have done the introduction wrong. You can’t just throw a group of pigs together-it took my 2 pigs a whole week to establish dominance and to get comfy with each other...
 

Wiebke

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Thank you for the welcome! She is an only guinea pig, yes...(The store that I bought her from actually told me not to get another. She was in the adoption centre as she had been treated for ringworm and when they tried to integrate her back, it wasn't successful. Having read online/ research, I am slightly worried as it does say everywhere to keep them in pairs but the store have still said not to...A little bit stuck, to be honest!). She was originally sold as a boy (her name is Forrest Gump haha) but when the store member was demonstrating a health check, I pointed out the 'nipples' and they then said it was a little girl, I have just found out on this forum that both boys and girls have nipples so I am going to check her downstairs asap!
Please do! Rumblestrutting is very much typical boar behaviour. Sows generally do it only when they come into season.
Please feel for the presence/absence of a penis ridge under skin and the presence/absence of a fleshy seal inside the slit (the photos in the guide tell you exactly where to look and how the slit insides should look). If the answer is coming back the same from each area, you know that you have the correct gender. These areas are much clearer than just looking at the arrangement of the genitalia, which is why mis-sexing is so common. If necessary, ask somebody else to hold your piggy for you.
I guess that also should answer your question as to how much the pet shop staff REALLY know about the pets they are selling, shouldn't it? :yikes:

However, please don't run out and get another one from the same place straight away!
Firstly you need make sure that any ringworm spores still potentially sitting in the coat have gone (I had ringworm carried in twice that way) by giving your piggy a fungal bath. We normally don't recommend baths, but in this case it is very important and can save you some really messes down the line! If you have an ex-ringworm piggy, getting hold of some good vet grade disinfectant (brand names in the guide) is one of the best investments you can ever make. You can use the disinfectant for a deep clean every 3 or 6 months anyway.
When you bathe, please do so in a bowl sitting on a towel on the bottom of a shower or bathtub so your piggy cannot injure itself if it blind jumps, and can also not escape. have another dry towel waiting. any water should not be higher than 1 inch and should be baby warm. For a one-off bath, nizoral or any dandruff shampoo from a pharmacy will do the trick.
What to check and look out for in new guinea pigs (vet checks, sexing, parasites&illness)
Ringworm: Hygiene And Pictures

Before you get another one please do your research re. cage sizes. Pet shops will sell anything to get repeat customers for food and bedding. Most cages are too small (but generally overpriced). Buying a small pet is by far the cheapest bit. The most expensive is vet care.
If you have a good standard safe rescue you can get to, please contact them for a dating slot on their adoption days. At least you can be sure that way that you will adopt only a healthy/quarantine and vet treated, properly sexed piggy and that you come home with a new same sex mate only if acceptance has happened, which a goes a long way towards a stable bond. A few US rescues even have spayed sows.
UK: Recommended Guinea Pig Rescues
US and some other countries: Guinea Lynx :: Rescue Organizations

Please take the time to do your research first before you get a second guinea pig, but also be aware that guinea pigs are social animals that live in groups and that are not really wired to be all on their own. But they are also great individual personalities, so it is not a matter of simply sticking another piggy into the cage.

You can find lots of good and helpful information via this link here, but are welcome to ask any further questions you have in our Care sections: Getting Started - New Owners' Most Helpful Guides
 
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