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Singled Out Boar - Should I Get Another Piggy?

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blacklegkat

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My lovely boar Asterix unfortunately doesn't seem to get along too well with his brothers. In fact, if we were to put them in the same cage, there would probably be blood. We separated him from his two brothers a long time ago - however we have the cages right next to one another so that they can talk to each-other. My father and I recently started getting concerned for Asterix - while he doesn't seem to be totally depressed, he lies around all day because he has no one to play with. We've heard that neutering a male piggy and placing him with a sow is a really good combination and we really want to know more about it. The problem is, we're scared that if we got a sow maybe they wouldn't get along, and we'd either have the original problem but twice, or we would have to return the sow, which would break our hearts. Any ideas on what we should do? I would really appreciate some advice on this subject <3
 

Wiebke

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#3
My lovely boar Asterix unfortunately doesn't seem to get along too well with his brothers. In fact, if we were to put them in the same cage, there would probably be blood. We separated him from his two brothers a long time ago - however we have the cages right next to one another so that they can talk to each-other. My father and I recently started getting concerned for Asterix - while he doesn't seem to be totally depressed, he lies around all day because he has no one to play with. We've heard that neutering a male piggy and placing him with a sow is a really good combination and we really want to know more about it. The problem is, we're scared that if we got a sow maybe they wouldn't get along, and we'd either have the original problem but twice, or we would have to return the sow, which would break our hearts. Any ideas on what we should do? I would really appreciate some advice on this subject <3
Hi and welcome!

Could you please add your country, state/province or UK county to your details (nothing more detailed than that, please of you are a minor) so we can help you better? Please click on your username on the top bar, then go to personal details and scroll down to location. this makes it appear with every post you make and allows us to tailor any advice and recommendations to what is available and relevant where you are straight away, considering that we have members and enquiries from all over the world. Thank you!

There are several options you can look into, but they all depend on your access to good rescues and vets.
- A number of good standard rescues offer boar dating at the rescue with a rescue boar under expert supervision. This means that you come home only with a new male companion if there has been acceptance and you have the backing of the rescue if there are problems with the bond at any stage. All of our recommended rescues practise a mandatory quarantine/medical care, so you are assured that any adopted piggy is healthy and can move in straight away.
Some few rescues also offer full/residential boar dating at the rescue, where your boar meets up to three rescue candidates over the course of a week. Any resulting bond is stress tested before the boars come home to you; it is as stable as a sow bond. There are however waiting lists as it is very time consuming. But if you can get to one of those rescues, it would be well worth the wait in view of the long term gain!

- Spayed sows are as rare as gold dust in the UK as the operation is usually only performed for medical reasons. The only rescue with a spaying policy has sadly closed down 3 years ago. But there a few rescues in other countries that spay.

- Boar neutering: The crucial bit is to find a good vet that is either well practised in guinea pig neutering or an exotics vet with experience in small furries' ops in order to minimise the risk of post-op complications. It really makes a huge difference. Our members may be able to give you recommendations. Some vets ask a lot more than others, but you also get a lot more recovery care for it.
What you have to factor in is a full 6 weeks' post-op wait until Asterix is 100% safe to go with any sows. The little baby in my avatar is the unplanned daughter of an over 5 weeks post-op boar (not one of mine), just to prove that point. It is rare, but it happens. I have heard of more cases since, but never of one over 6 weeks - and that despite all good UK rescues having practised the 6 weeks' deadline foe several years now with their own piggies.
Again, I would strongly recommend to date Asterix at a rescue. The key to any mixed gender bond is acceptance by the sows; this means that that is happening (or not) before you bring any piggies home, so you do not rn any risk yourself. You also have the guarantee that any sows are healthy and guaranteed not pregnant as they have to pass a 10 week pregnancy watch at a good rescue before they are being put up for adoption (unless they are born to pregnant intake, of course).
Anybody can call themselves a rescue without licensing and control, and the results are often sadly accordingly. That is the reason for our recommended UK rescues locator on the top bar - we list only the rescues that we have made sure of that you are in very safe hands at all stages of the process. We can provide a link to recommended rescues of comparable standard in some countries.

I hope that this helps you? Once we know youe general area, we can help you further with recommendations, so you and your dad can do your research before you commit to a course of action.
 
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