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yvette langford

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I took my 5 month old boar to the vet on Tuesday as he was squealing and straining to pee. They felt around to see if they could feel a stone. Nothing, so we were sent home with painkillers and antibiotics.
He seemed to be alright on Wednesday, not 100% but better than he was. Come Thursday night he was back to squealing and straining, got him an early morning appointment today. The vet did a thorough check while I was there, she found a lot of bits of sperm rod in his urethra, his bladder was very full with thick white slimy liquid. She told me to leave him there so she can examine him more. She did x-rays, ultrasound and inserted a catheter to flush out the bladder and urethra. I was told she couldn’t find a stone and has no idea what the issue is. She’s given me more painkillers and more antibiotics. Has anyone else had this? Could the sperm rod be the cause of the blockage?
 

yvette langford

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Kale was a big part of their diet until I found out that too much calcium was really bad for them. I’ve cut it out completely now. They eat lettuce, carrots, red peppers, green beans and cucumber
 

Piggies&buns

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When did you stop giving kale?
Do you filter their drinking water, particularly if you’re in a hard water area? Are pellets limited to one tablespoon per day? Unfiltered water and overfeeding pellets lead to an increased intake of calcium
Don’t give carrot too often either - it is too high in sugar and should just be an occasional treat
My knowledge of what to do when sludge is diagnosed is limited (although I appreciate your vet hasn’t actually said that it is sludge) but @Wiebke will be able to help further
 

Wiebke

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I took my 5 month old boar to the vet on Tuesday as he was squealing and straining to pee. They felt around to see if they could feel a stone. Nothing, so we were sent home with painkillers and antibiotics.
He seemed to be alright on Wednesday, not 100% but better than he was. Come Thursday night he was back to squealing and straining, got him an early morning appointment today. The vet did a thorough check while I was there, she found a lot of bits of sperm rod in his urethra, his bladder was very full with thick white slimy liquid. She told me to leave him there so she can examine him more. She did x-rays, ultrasound and inserted a catheter to flush out the bladder and urethra. I was told she couldn’t find a stone and has no idea what the issue is. She’s given me more painkillers and more antibiotics. Has anyone else had this? Could the sperm rod be the cause of the blockage?
Hi and welcome

It rather sounds like bladder sludge to me, which are calcium particles that don't coalesce into a stone but can pack the bladder and cause the same discomfort and symptoms as a bladder stone.
Treatment depends on how tightly packed the sludge is; in a not so tightly packed bladder, your vet can try to very carefully and gently flush out the sludge without risking backing up any urine into the kidneys. A tightly packed bladder requires an bladder operation when flushing is not possible.

I have never heard of sperm rod bits getting into the urethra and definitely never into the bladder!

Please review your diet, starting with the water, pellets and choice of veg in order to minimise the risk of more sludge build-up. while there can be a genetic disposition for stones and sludge, there is very often a strong diet component involved, too; especially in a hard water country like the UK.
Please be aware that a change in diet is not an instant fix; it needs time to work all that extra calcium out of the body for the longer term.
A change in diet can also not deal with any already existing build-up of calcium in the bladder or kidneys, whether that is sludge or stones; it can only gradually add less and less to it.
Here is the link; it contains a chapter on dietary tips for guinea pigs with urinary tract problems with tweaks to our recommended general diet: Long Term Balanced General And Special Needs Guinea Pig Diets

I would also strongly recommend to put your boy on cystease capsules. These are a glucosamine based cat food supplement (NOT a medication); this will help to ease the discomfort and inflammation in the beleaguered bladder walls, which have a natural glucosamine coating. You mix the contents of 1 capsule with 2-4 ml of water. Give half every 12 hours (i.e. 1 capsule per day) for the long term.
Cats are the other pet species prone to urinary tract problems. Feliway cystease capsules are widely available online.

Here are our post-op/post-GA care tips. Please contact your vet asap if your boy is suddenly starting to deteriorate at any point.
Tips For Post-operative Care
Emergency, Crisis and Bridging Care until a Vet Appointment

Here is our recommended vets locator: Recommended Guinea Pig Vets

More information on bladder sludge: Guinea Lynx :: Bladder Stones
 

yvette langford

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When did you stop giving kale?
Do you filter their drinking water, particularly if you’re in a hard water area? Are pellets limited to one tablespoon per day? Unfiltered water and overfeeding pellets lead to an increased intake of calcium
Don’t give carrot too often either - it is too high in sugar and should just be an occasional treat
My knowledge of what to do when sludge is diagnosed is limited (although I appreciate your vet hasn’t actually said that it is sludge) but @Wiebke will be able to help further
The vet has sent off a urine sample to be tested at the lab, but she did do a few tests herself, his ph balance and all that stuff was right.
I stopped the kale two weeks ago. I’ll cut down on the carrots too now, thank you
 

Wiebke

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The vet has sent off a urine sample to be tested at the lab, but she did do a few tests herself, his ph balance and all that stuff was right.
I stopped the kale two weeks ago. I’ll cut down on the carrots too now, thank you
Please read the links I have given you re. some very specific diet recommendation for bladder piggies for the remainder of their lives. 2 weeks is too short a time to have any effect yet.
 
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