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GuineaPigLover7891

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Hi! I have two boars (Patches and Carmal). I had to leave them alone for a week, but I had someone looking after them. Before I left, they would eat all their pellets by evening. This morning, I woke up around 10 am, and they had eaten the whole bowl. The thing is, that there are two bowls with pellets in it. The second bowl had a lot of pellets in. They get one bowl each. They also don’t get any veggies because of their soft stool/poop. I don’t know if this helps, but they also have white pee. I give them a vitamin c table daily. I’m also trying a digestive support tablet. I’ve heard people have had success with them. They won’t eat it though. So right now the only thing they can eat is hay and pellets. They’ve been off veggies for about 2 weeks to a month by now. I just need some advice on what to do! Carmal the younger one weighs 1 lbs. and 6 oz. (about 624 grams) and Patches the older one weighs 2 lbs (about 907 grams)

Thank you in advance!
 
D

Dm289719

You could try crushing the tablets in with the pellets or just hiding them there also give them vitamin c drop the ones that you put on there pellets and see if this works and make sure to take them to the vets
 

Wiebke

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Hi! I have two boars (Patches and Carmal). I had to leave them alone for a week, but I had someone looking after them. Before I left, they would eat all their pellets by evening. This morning, I woke up around 10 am, and they had eaten the whole bowl. The thing is, that there are two bowls with pellets in it. The second bowl had a lot of pellets in. They get one bowl each. They also don’t get any veggies because of their soft stool/poop. I don’t know if this helps, but they also have white pee. I give them a vitamin c table daily. I’m also trying a digestive support tablet. I’ve heard people have had success with them. They won’t eat it though. So right now the only thing they can eat is hay and pellets. They’ve been off veggies for about 2 weeks to a month by now. I just need some advice on what to do! Carmal the younger one weighs 1 lbs. and 6 oz. (about 624 grams) and Patches the older one weighs 2 lbs (about 907 grams)

Thank you in advance!

Hi!

Please check the full bowl whether one of the piggies did pee in it.
Please only feed 1 tablespoon of pellets per piggy per day and a careful mix of veg. Your is too high in calcium if you see them regularly, which is excreted via the pee and causes the milky pee and powdery white patches on any fleece.
Over 80% of the diet should be hay, hay and more hay for dental and gut health, which translate to better long term health and a longer life. Be aware that grass and hay are actually quite high in calcium, which is the first reason why guinea pigs never had the need to make their own (unlike rabbits). The highly abrasive silica in the hay and grass is what guinea pig back teeth have evolved against. Too much pellets and veg in the diet means that the crucial back teeth are more likely to overgrow and too much veg that the fermentation process is more likely to go into overdrive and cause bloating or diarrhea. Hay is the mainstay of any piggy diet while veg (about 10%) and pellets (about 5%) are more in the way of daily treats. ;)
Please take the time to read this guide here; it looks at all food groups in detail. We have a picture of a sample veg diet, which you may find helpful for a balanced veg diet. Long Term Balanced General And Special Needs Guinea Pig Diets


Please be careful in not feeding too much extra vitamin C. It can lead to long term problems when especially young piggies get used to high levels of vitamin C - they are much more likely to develop symptoms of scurvy (vitamin C deficiency) whenever the vitamin C level drops for some reason (gap in the diet, illness etc). A good hay based diet is generally enough.
It is generally better to give a 2-3 week booster course of extra vitamin C whenever your piggies are ill to help their immune system when it really needs it than accustoming the immune system to a high level so it reacts to every drop but you do not have any space left for upping the amount whenever needed. :(
 
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