• Discussions taking place within this forum are intended for the purpose of assisting you in discussing options with your vet. Any other use of advice given here is done so at your risk, is solely your responsibility and not that of this forum or its owner. Before posting it is your responsibility you abide by this Statement

Young Guinea Pig Help! Hind Legs Gave Out Suddenly

Status
Not open for further replies.

Piglet2020

New Born Pup
Joined
Mar 11, 2017
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
Points
25
Two days ago, I gave my 2 year old male guinea pig a bath in warm water. After having him in the water for 2 minutes, his hind legs suddenly gave out and he was dragging himself using his front paws. I took him out immediately.
Afterwards, I noticed his eyes were sunken in. I gave him plenty of water and vegetables and fruits to re-hydrate him (celery, lettuce, slices of tomato and apples). His appetite did not change, as he eagerly ate these. I also gave him vitamin C chews, but he doesnt eat them. His droppings were black and tear-shaped. Now, the droppings are oval and brownish.
He is walking normally now. I'm giving him more floor time and he's actively exploring. He doesn't seem to be as active, however. In the past, he would run around, but he doesn't really "run" or popcorn anymore. He isn't as vocal anymore either. He used to wheek for food all the time. He's more lethargic in his hideout when he's inside his cage.
I checked his paws and there doesn't seem to be any scabs or injuries. I'm not sure if his foot is inflamed. (I always assumed that the padding is supposed to be like this).
Lately, I haven't given him timothy hay or pellets, because I fed leafy greens and vegetables. I have since reverted back to his diet of hay, pellets, and fruits/vegetables with vitamin C chews.

IMG_3563.JPG

IMG_3568.JPG
 

Wiebke

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Mar 10, 2009
Messages
76,037
Reaction score
52,450
Points
3,466
Location
Coventry UK
Two days ago, I gave my 2 year old male guinea pig a bath in warm water. After having him in the water for 2 minutes, his hind legs suddenly gave out and he was dragging himself using his front paws. I took him out immediately.
Afterwards, I noticed his eyes were sunken in. I gave him plenty of water and vegetables and fruits to re-hydrate him (celery, lettuce, slices of tomato and apples). His appetite did not change, as he eagerly ate these. I also gave him vitamin C chews, but he doesnt eat them. His droppings were black and tear-shaped. Now, the droppings are oval and brownish.
He is walking normally now. I'm giving him more floor time and he's actively exploring. He doesn't seem to be as active, however. In the past, he would run around, but he doesn't really "run" or popcorn anymore. He isn't as vocal anymore either. He used to wheek for food all the time. He's more lethargic in his hideout when he's inside his cage.
I checked his paws and there doesn't seem to be any scabs or injuries. I'm not sure if his foot is inflamed. (I always assumed that the padding is supposed to be like this).
Lately, I haven't given him timothy hay or pellets, because I fed leafy greens and vegetables. I have since reverted back to his diet of hay, pellets, and fruits/vegetables with vitamin C chews.

View attachment 60313

View attachment 60314
Hi!

Please have him checked by a vet as soon as you can! Lethargy is always very very worrying!

Be aware that over 80% of the daily food intake should be hay, hay, hay, whether that is timothy, meadow or orchard hay. Fresh veg and herbs (and only very little fruit twice a week; there is more vitamin C in peppers and fresh herbs than in acidic fruit) should make about 10-15% and pellets about 5%. Guinea pig guts are not laid out for a fresh veg diet only; they are laid out for nutrionally poor fibrous silica-rich hay. The silica is what grinds down the crucial back teeth and prevents them from overgrowing; so you'd better also have his premolar checked in case they are contributing to the problem.
Recommendations For A Balanced General Guinea Pig Diet

Please correct that promptly; monitor his weight and start syringe feeding him fibre (powdered recovery food and water) if necessary.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top