• Dying, terminal illness and euthanasia: New sensitive support guide for guinea pig owners Please Click Here

Our guinea pigs are hiding from us.

Peppypiggies

New Born Pup
Joined
Apr 28, 2019
Messages
2
Reaction score
2
Points
40
Hello all! I’m looking for some guidance today since our two young piggies Fawn and Willow are hiding from us and seem quite scared of us. If they can see you, they will hide. Even if you’re a good distance away from them. They run into their little house and don’t come out until you’ve left and haven’t been there for a while. I’m 99% sure it’s because they’re extremely new to our home, it’s hardly been 2 days but I’m just looking for confirmation from some more experienced owners! Some tips would be great aswell x
 

David Piggie Lover

Forum Donator 2019/20
Joined
May 25, 2017
Messages
4,462
Reaction score
8,448
Points
1,475
Location
lancashire
Oh guys. if I was a piggie and in a new home and my piggie slaves were 100 times bigger than me. I would hide also.
There's nothing wrong with this its normal.
There's lots into on this site to help you as it does me about everything piggie New old sec.
Pictue of piggies be great.
Mine say hello. 20190224_210213.jpg
 

amber89

Junior Guinea Pig
Joined
Apr 17, 2019
Messages
149
Reaction score
258
Points
310
Location
Vienna, Austria
Hey.

It is perfectly normal behaviour. Guinea pigs are prey animals and in the wild they have quite a lot of predators, so fleeing at the slightest sound is their way of surviving. They are in a brand new environment, new smells, new sounds and humans are predators for this little creatures.

The guinea pigs that are with me for already 2, respectively 3 months, still run away from me and are scared of me. When i am sneezing or entering the room too fast they immediately dart into the closest house.

Give them some more time. Try to stay in front of the cage just talking to them, tell them whatever, what you dreamed last night, what are your plans for today...whatever, they will get used to your voice. Having some veggies handy might also help. They will start associating you with veggies and you will not be so scary anymore.

Have patience, Rome was not built in a day :)
 

David Piggie Lover

Forum Donator 2019/20
Joined
May 25, 2017
Messages
4,462
Reaction score
8,448
Points
1,475
Location
lancashire
Hey.

It is perfectly normal behaviour. Guinea pigs are prey animals and in the wild they have quite a lot of predators, so fleeing at the slightest sound is their way of surviving. They are in a brand new environment, new smells, new sounds and humans are predators for this little creatures.

The guinea pigs that are with me for already 2, respectively 3 months, still run away from me and are scared of me. When i am sneezing or entering the room too fast they immediately dart into the closest house.

Give them some more time. Try to stay in front of the cage just talking to them, tell them whatever, what you dreamed last night, what are your plans for today...whatever, they will get used to your voice. Having some veggies handy might also help. They will start associating you with veggies and you will not be so scary anymore.

Have patience, Rome was not built in a day :)
Great advise. if I cough then 4 piggies dart and hide. and i say sorry.
 

Seven7

Forum Donator 2019/20
Joined
Apr 26, 2018
Messages
1,424
Reaction score
1,475
Points
775
Location
Michigan USA
My Finn and Lara will stay in plain view to eat veggies, herbs, and fruits. They can also tolerate my petting them when eating their meals. They also run towards me when I make noise with their Oxbow hay bag and allow my petting while munching in their hay pan.

Mine are easily convinced by food, any food, and they are not shy about coming to receive their meals. Mine are true piggies.
 

David Piggie Lover

Forum Donator 2019/20
Joined
May 25, 2017
Messages
4,462
Reaction score
8,448
Points
1,475
Location
lancashire
My Finn and Lara will stay in plain view to eat veggies, herbs, and fruits. They can also tolerate my petting them when eating their meals. They also run towards me when I make noise with their Oxbow hay bag and allow my petting while munching in their hay pan.

Mine are easily convinced by food, any food, and they are not shy about coming to receive their meals. Mine are true piggies.
Bit unfair to say true piggies. Most piggies hide as it's their nature to do so when they feel threatened.
It's great when like yours love the reward of food and human companionship.
I say brill piggies not true.
 

Caris

Junior Guinea Pig
Joined
Feb 28, 2019
Messages
106
Reaction score
262
Points
285
As of today, I've had my guinea pigs for two months. I'm not sure how much advice I can give, because I'm still very much learning, but I found that covering my guys' cage with a blanket for the first week or so, gradually lifting the sides of the blanket each day, helped. It was basically like a giant hidey where they felt safe. They could hear and smell me, but since they were protected and the scary predator couldn't see them, they were happy to venture out and explore and get to know (and destroy) their cage, and were feeling comfortable by the time all sides were off.

Also, talk! Talk, talk, and talk! Predators don't give away their presence so talking helps to settle them. I sometimes just sit by the cage and chatter away, and they very soon learnt to ignore me. I also have funny little mantras, sayings, so they know what I'm doing or about to do by the tone of my voice. Things like "You're ok! I'm not interested! I'm not interested! Just getting a drink!" for when I stand up and move around and leave the room or "Just sweeping, just sweeping!" (my cage cleaning song, although now it includes "Merlin, get off the dustpan! Merlin! Merlin!"). It sounds and feels silly, but they do recognise it and settle down.

I also made sure that my interactions with them and their cage didn't just involve trying to pick them up, and, well, interact with them. Poo picking, I basically ignored them to begin with (now, it's a case of them being "OH NO YOU DON'T! YOU ARE GIVING US FOOD! PAY ATTENTION TO US, SLAVE!" and not letting me ignore them), so they get used to you being around the cage and it not meaning they're immediately going to picked up or stroked and that the scary creature isn't going to eat them.

Food is also very much the way to a piggy's heart. My two will literally climb on top of each other (Arthur literally does climb on top of Merlin's head) for pellets. They love them. I started off offering the food between my fingers, so they barely had to come near me, and when they were happy taking food from me that way, I'd offer it open palmed, so that they had to take the food from my hand, and then I slowly started touching and patting them, so now they're quite happy to let me stroke them because it means food! delicious food. I also made them come to me. They now line up at the edge of the cage the moment I rattle the food bag (they've finally started wheeking), and know they have to put their feet on the side before they can have some. If they don't come to me, well, no extra tasty pellets. (I do still feed them, promise.)

It's gradual little things that help to build up both your relationship with them, and their confidence. It definitely takes time, but every new little thing is so rewarding!
 

David Piggie Lover

Forum Donator 2019/20
Joined
May 25, 2017
Messages
4,462
Reaction score
8,448
Points
1,475
Location
lancashire
As of today, I've had my guinea pigs for two months. I'm not sure how much advice I can give, because I'm still very much learning, but I found that covering my guys' cage with a blanket for the first week or so, gradually lifting the sides of the blanket each day, helped. It was basically like a giant hidey where they felt safe. They could hear and smell me, but since they were protected and the scary predator couldn't see them, they were happy to venture out and explore and get to know (and destroy) their cage, and were feeling comfortable by the time all sides were off.

Also, talk! Talk, talk, and talk! Predators don't give away their presence so talking helps to settle them. I sometimes just sit by the cage and chatter away, and they very soon learnt to ignore me. I also have funny little mantras, sayings, so they know what I'm doing or about to do by the tone of my voice. Things like "You're ok! I'm not interested! I'm not interested! Just getting a drink!" for when I stand up and move around and leave the room or "Just sweeping, just sweeping!" (my cage cleaning song, although now it includes "Merlin, get off the dustpan! Merlin! Merlin!"). It sounds and feels silly, but they do recognise it and settle down.

I also made sure that my interactions with them and their cage didn't just involve trying to pick them up, and, well, interact with them. Poo picking, I basically ignored them to begin with (now, it's a case of them being "OH NO YOU DON'T! YOU ARE GIVING US FOOD! PAY ATTENTION TO US, SLAVE!" and not letting me ignore them), so they get used to you being around the cage and it not meaning they're immediately going to picked up or stroked and that the scary creature isn't going to eat them.

Food is also very much the way to a piggy's heart. My two will literally climb on top of each other (Arthur literally does climb on top of Merlin's head) for pellets. They love them. I started off offering the food between my fingers, so they barely had to come near me, and when they were happy taking food from me that way, I'd offer it open palmed, so that they had to take the food from my hand, and then I slowly started touching and patting them, so now they're quite happy to let me stroke them because it means food! delicious food. I also made them come to me. They now line up at the edge of the cage the moment I rattle the food bag (they've finally started wheeking), and know they have to put their feet on the side before they can have some. If they don't come to me, well, no extra tasty pellets. (I do still feed them, promise.)

It's gradual little things that help to build up both your relationship with them, and their confidence. It definitely takes time, but every new little thing is so rewarding!
Great reply and well done.
Had to smile with the dustpan bit.
Heidi loves watching and been known to wobble through a pile of rubbish ready for pick up. Lol
 

Seven7

Forum Donator 2019/20
Joined
Apr 26, 2018
Messages
1,424
Reaction score
1,475
Points
775
Location
Michigan USA
Bit unfair to say true piggies. Most piggies hide as it's their nature to do so when they feel threatened.
It's great when like yours love the reward of food and human companionship.
I say brill piggies not true.
I do agree all piggies are different. I was only referring to the way my piggies' mouthes busily move about while munching on their meals, and the fact that mine eat hay all day despite having three meals of veggies a day. Just the pure visual aspect of them eating their meals makes me think of piggy, not to mention mine call for food every two hours.
 

Peppypiggies

New Born Pup
Joined
Apr 28, 2019
Messages
2
Reaction score
2
Points
40
Update! They’re doing a whole lot better now! Willow will stay and she doesn’t run back inside, fawn on the other hand still runs inside but I’m sure with a little encouragement from Wils she will be doing great it no time! Thank you guys for all the help x
 
Top