Should i introduce a know 'aggressive' piggie to the group

MintyChocolate

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Hi, So my little brother really wants a Guinea pig. Since i was already planning to get a third guinea pig i agreed to let him own my third one. All good right? Later when we went to buy some hay from the pet shop this plan was completely ruined when he fell in love with a little black piggie in the adoption section. Anyway the plaque said he needed a new home because he didn't get along with other piggies. My mum said he could get it as we have a spare cage perfect for one pig. But i don't really trust the pet shop. Do you think it really could just be that he needs to live alone? I thought about at least trying to introduce him to my piggies but hes a boar and they are sows.... I really don't think i could afford to neuter him immediately especially as it is supposed to be my little brothers responsibility and i have vet bills already.
So i was wondering if its ok to let him live alone, and if not if its ok to let him live alone for now, (1 or 2 months). I don't know i feel bad having my little herd all social and happy and then having him be alone.
 

VickiA

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If you do decide to take in the boar you will need to keep him very securely away from your sows for 6 full weeks post neutering before he would be “safe” for an introduction. Are you able to have him in a secure cage where he can hear your girls but not have access to them? Please be warned that boars can be very determined to reach sows especially if they are in season, so you have to be very careful to keep them well apart.
 
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DM030819

@MintyChocolate Alot of the time "aggressive" pigs who MUST live on their own according to a pet shop are just misunderstood and it shows that the pet shop isn't too knowledgeable about pigs.

That pig just hasn't met the right friend yet so he may get on with your pigs.

You definitely don't want to introduce him to your girls yet as you will 100% end up with babies. I'd also be careful with your brother as he may let them together and it only takes a few seconds for babies to happen.
 

MintyChocolate

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If you do decide to take in the boar you will need to keep him very securely away from your sows for 6 full weeks post neutering before he would be “safe” for an introduction. Are you able to have him in a secure cage where he can hear your girls but not have access to them? Please be warned that boars can be very determined to reach sows especially if they are in season, so you have to be very careful to keep them well apart.
Thanks and yes i can either keep him in my room, might take a little persuading from my brother but it shouldn't be a problem or in his room which is right next door, in any case they will be in separate cages. The only thing that worries me is that after all the time alone he will be even harder to introduce.
 

Wiebke

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Hi, So my little brother really wants a Guinea pig. Since i was already planning to get a third guinea pig i agreed to let him own my third one. All good right? Later when we went to buy some hay from the pet shop this plan was completely ruined when he fell in love with a little black piggie in the adoption section. Anyway the plaque said he needed a new home because he didn't get along with other piggies. My mum said he could get it as we have a spare cage perfect for one pig. But i don't really trust the pet shop. Do you think it really could just be that he needs to live alone? I thought about at least trying to introduce him to my piggies but hes a boar and they are sows.... I really don't think i could afford to neuter him immediately especially as it is supposed to be my little brothers responsibility and i have vet bills already.
So i was wondering if its ok to let him live alone, and if not if its ok to let him live alone for now, (1 or 2 months). I don't know i feel bad having my little herd all social and happy and then having him be alone.
Hi!

Please keep the single boar adjacent to your sow cage for round the clock interaction and stimulation, which guinea pigs need.

However, unless your little boy is 6 weeks post-neutering operation, he will not under any circumstances be allowed to physically interact with your sows at any time, EVER!
Neither boars nor sows have a menopause and ever stop being able to reproduce. Sows can come into season spontaneously in presence of boar pheromones when they are close enough to a season and boars can be amazingly athletic and determined to get at a sow in season. The problem is that even with the best of care every fifth birth ends with the death of babies and/or mum; with increasing risk of complications the older sows get. That is not something you want to risk.

Please make sure that your little brother is not able to put the piggies together for 'play time' EVER and get at the piggies without supervision at any time. Impregnation takes only seconds and happens too quickly for you stop it.

Your little boy is not unbondable. He is simply one of many failed shop boars that have been bought as a pair for looks and not for character compatibility and that have been forced to live in far too small cages. Then at around 4 months of age, the boys hit the teenage months with a bang and have no chance to get away from each other as they would normally do. He has then been failed again by being dumped back into the pet shop as an 'aggressive' piggy that is not getting on with others. Please do not fail him again by keeping him away from other piggies. He is currently a testosterone steeped boar, but he is not going to stay like that forever.

All he needs is either a neutering operation so he can live safely with sows OR he can be bonded with another boar at a good standard rescue that allows boar dating - i.e. boar meetings under expert supervision so the boars themselves can decide whether they like each other and want to live together or not. Hundreds of rescue bonded boars are living proof that boars are not condemned to live alone ever! Please be aware that not all rescues offer boar dating and by far not all rescues are good standard since anybody can call themselves a rescue or a breeder without needing a licence or receiving any checks. We have got lists of recommended rescues for several countries.

PS: Several of my own 'husboars' (neutered boars living with one or several sows) are fallen out unwanted boars that failed to hit it off other boys and are now living a very happy and fulfilled life. Even my boar pair is neutered (Nosgan is not landing with any sows, so I adopted a little laid-back boarmate for him); simply because they live in a room with lots of sows and the risk of accidental meetings is just too high and NOT because it makes them live together better (neutering doesn't change personality or social interactive behaviour or even stops the production of testosterone).

We can help you much more if we know which country you are in. We have members and enquiries from all world.
 
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MintyChocolate

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@MintyChocolate Alot of the time "aggressive" pigs who MUST live on their own according to a pet shop are just misunderstood and it shows that the pet shop isn't too knowledgeable about pigs.

That pig just hasn't met the right friend yet so he may get on with your pigs.

You definitely don't want to introduce him to your girls yet as you will 100% end up with babies. I'd also be careful with your brother as he may let them together and it only takes a few seconds for babies to happen.
Yeah i was worried the pet shop may not know much especially since judging by what the lady said they were simply reported that he 'must not live with others' but i don't think they actually tried themselves. Honestly it makes me more tempted to get him as some people will definitely take what they said to heart. knowing what i was like when i was my brothers age this piggie will probably end up mine anyway, so i'll probably have save up myself to get him neutered and try introduce him. Definitely not now though. I love guinea pigs but i don't think i could handle babies!
 

MintyChocolate

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Hi!

Please keep the single boar adjacent to your sow cage for round the clock interaction and stimulation, which guinea pigs need.

However, unless your little boy is 6 weeks post-neutering operation, he will not under any circumstances be allowed to physically interact with your sows at any time, EVER!
Neither boars nor sows have a menopause and ever stop being able to reproduce. Sows can come into season spontaneously in presence of boar pheromones when they are close enough to a season and boars can be amazingly athletic and determined to get at a sow in season. The problem is that even with the best of care every fifth birth ends with the death of babies and/or mum; with increasing risk of complications the older sows get. That is not something you want to risk. Please make sure that your little brother is not able to put the piggies together for 'play time' EVER.

Your little boy is not unbondable. He is simply one of many failed shop boars that have been bought as a pair for looks and not for character compatibility and that have been forced to live in far too small cages. Then at around 4 months of age, the boys hit the teenage months with a bang and have no chance to get away from each other as they would normally do. He has then been failed again by being dumped back into the pet shop as an 'aggressive' piggy that is not getting on with others. Please do not fail him again by keeping him away from other piggies. He is currently a testosterone steeped boar, but he is not going to stay like that forever.

All he needs is either a neutering operation so he can live safely with sows or he can be bonded with another boar at a good rescue that allows boar dating - i.e. boar meetings under expert supervision so the boars themselves can decide whether they like each other and want to live together or not. Hundreds of rescue bonded boars are living proof that boars are not condemned to live alone ever!

Several of my own 'husboars' (neutered boars living with one or several sows) are fallen out unwanted boars that failed to hit it off other boys and are now living a very happy and fulfilled life. Even my boar pair is neutered (Nosgan is not landing with any sows, so I adopted a little laid-back boarmate for him); simply because they live in a room with lots of sows and the risk of accidental meetings is just too high.

We can help you much more if we know which country you are in. We have members and enquiries from all world.
Thank you, while my first preference would be to introduce him to the others (after neutering of course), i have also heard of 'boar dating' i don't suppose you would any places in UK-Yorkshire that offer this?
 

Wiebke

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Thank you, while my first preference would be to introduce him to the others (after neutering of course), i have also heard of 'boar dating' i don't suppose you would any places in UK-Yorkshire that offer this?
The current best place would be Cavy Corner in Doncaster as two other rescues in West and South Yorkshire have sadly either recently closed down or suspended their guinea pig section. But if you can get there, you will be in the best and most experienced hands possible, so it is well worth any longer journey!
If you live in the North, Tees Valley Guinea Pig Rescue in Middlesbrough would be your closest rescue.
Here is our recommended UK rescues list (you can find it on the top bar). Recommended Guinea Pig Rescues

You may also find these guides here interesting and helpful:
Boars: Teenage, Bullying, Fighting, Fall-outs And What Next?
Neutered / De-sexed Boars And Neutering Operations: Myths And Facts
Bonding: Illustrated Dominance Behaviours And Dynamics
 
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MintyChocolate

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The current best place would be Cavy Corner in Doncaster as two other rescues in West and South Yorkshire have sadly either recently closed down or suspended their guinea pig section. But if you can get there, you will be in the best and most experienced hands possible, so it is well worth any longer journey!
If you live in the North, Tees Valley Guinea Pig Rescue in Middlesbrough would be your closest rescue.
Here is our recommended UK rescues list (you can find it on the top bar). Recommended Guinea Pig Rescues

You may also find these guides here interesting and helpful:
Boars: Teenage, Bullying, Fighting, Fall-outs And What Next?
Neutered / De-sexed Boars And Neutering Operations: Myths And Facts
Bonding: Illustrated Dominance Behaviours And Dynamics
Thank you! That's not too far away, Ill definitely look into it! I do definitely want to make sure the poor thing is not alone.
 
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