• Discussions taking place within this forum are intended for the purpose of assisting you in discussing options with your vet. Any other use of advice given here is done so at your risk, is solely your responsibility and not that of this forum or its owner. Before posting it is your responsibility you abide by this Statement

Is this a scratch or some kind of infection?

jenibee

New Born Pup
Joined
May 29, 2019
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
Points
35
So like a day ago I noticed what looked like dried poo on my guinea pigs nose. I tried to wipe it off but he kept moving and it wouldn't really come off. Today morning I saw that he had this red swipe above his nose. Could this be a scratch from maybe him trying to clean himself?


IMG_1980.jpegIMG_1979.jpegIMG_1978.jpeg
the first two pictures are how his nose was before the red mark
 

Betsy

Forum Donator 2020/21
Joined
Mar 26, 2017
Messages
27,699
Reaction score
35,861
Points
2,425
Location
Broadstone, Dorset
Welcome to the forum! I would take your piggy to the vet for a check just to be on the safe side. It may be nothing to worry about but then it also could be something to worry about it is difficult to tell from a photo. A vet would rather see a healthy piggy and an anxious owner rather than an ill piggy with an owner who has left it too late.
 

Wiebke

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Mar 10, 2009
Messages
71,645
Reaction score
44,100
Points
3,466
Location
Coventry UK
So like a day ago I noticed what looked like dried poo on my guinea pigs nose. I tried to wipe it off but he kept moving and it wouldn't really come off. Today morning I saw that he had this red swipe above his nose. Could this be a scratch from maybe him trying to clean himself?


View attachment 114382View attachment 114383View attachment 114384
the first two pictures are how his nose was before the red mark
Hi and welcome!

It is very difficult to tell at this stage whether it is the start of a fungal infection or not. If is dried snot from a big sneeze, it usually just falls off and doesn't take any skin with it.

Keep an eye on it and see whether there is hair loss and a white crust developing in that area in the coming days; in that case see a vet for a fungal infection, potentially ringworm. Please do not treat on spec as that will make any diagnosis very difficult.
If things stay like this, then it is just a minor scab.
Ringworm: Hygiene And Pictures

How long have you had your guinea pig?
 

jenibee

New Born Pup
Joined
May 29, 2019
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
Points
35
Hi and welcome!

It is very difficult to tell at this stage whether it is the start of a fungal infection or not. If is dried snot from a big sneeze, it usually just falls off and doesn't take any skin with it.

Keep an eye on it and see whether there is hair loss and a white crust developing in that area in the coming days; in that case see a vet for a fungal infection, potentially ringworm. Please do not treat on spec as that will make any diagnosis very difficult.
If things stay like this, then it is just a minor scab.
Ringworm: Hygiene And Pictures

How long have you had your guinea pig?


A little more than a month maybe. Would an infection be deadly?
 

Merab's Slave

Forum Buddy
Joined
Nov 27, 2017
Messages
20,275
Reaction score
23,590
Points
2,375
Location
Wirral, UK
I would also suggest a trip to the vet.
Anything that concerns you is worth the visit for reassurance if nothing else
 

Betsy

Forum Donator 2020/21
Joined
Mar 26, 2017
Messages
27,699
Reaction score
35,861
Points
2,425
Location
Broadstone, Dorset
It will certainly make your piggy uncomfortable, distressed and possibly in pain if it is ill.

You need to follow the 5 freedoms of animal welfare and these are:-
  1. Freedom from hunger and thirst by ready access to fresh water and diet to maintain health and vigor. This must be specific to the animal. For example, puppies, adult dogs, pregnant cats, and senior cats all need different types of food provided on different schedules.
  2. Freedom from discomfort by providing an appropriate environment including shelter and a comfortable resting area. This means you should provide soft bedding and an area with appropriate temperature, noise levels, and access to natural light. If an animal is outside, it must have shelter from the elements as well as appropriate food and water bowls that will not freeze or tip over.
  3. Freedom from pain, injury, or disease by prevention or rapid diagnosis and treatment. This includes vaccinating animals, monitoring animals, physical health, treating any injuries and providing appropriate medications.
  4. Freedom to express normal behavior by providing sufficient space, proper facilities, and company of the animal's own kind. Animals need to be able to interact with — or avoid — others of their own kind as desired. They must be able to stretch every part of their body (from nose to tail), and run, jump, and play. This can be particularly challenging when animals are housed in individual kennels.
  5. Freedom from fear and distress by ensuring conditions and treatment which avoid mental suffering. The mental health of an animal is just as important as its physical health — as psychological stress can quickly transition into physical illness. These conditions can be achieved by preventing overcrowding and providing sufficient enrichment and safe hiding spaces.
A trip to the vet is what is needed. For your peace of mind if nothing else.
 

Wiebke

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Mar 10, 2009
Messages
71,645
Reaction score
44,100
Points
3,466
Location
Coventry UK
A little more than a month maybe. Would an infection be deadly?
No, a properly treated fungal skin infection is not deadly, won't go past nuisance level if you see a vet promptly once you notice it spreading and can be got of on top with the right hygiene and products, but it should not be underestimated!

If it is ringworm, then you are dealing with single most cross species contagious issue (including humans). Your biggest problem will be getting on top of the spores and preventing them from spreading and causing repeated returns or further transmission. That is why hygiene is so important and key to a permanent recovery and where our ringworm guide comes into play. In a dozen years we have pretty much found every possible angle of transmission and how to eliminate it. ;)

Any fungal outbreak has to run its due course; the affected spot is going to look worse before it is going to look better (see the pictures in the ringworm link, which document the various stages of infection and recovery). But with good hygiene and the appropriate treatment you can keep it to that one affected patch.

The other fungal varieties are somewhat less aggressive and not quite as contagious, but the same rules apply.

With any transmittable skin problem (parasitic or fungal), you need to treat all piggies, other pets and humans in contact with the affected piggy. Transmission can happen as soon as you notice crusty exudate.

Ringworm has unfortunately become rather common in newly bought pet shop piggies because the invisible spores are so difficult to eradicate and transmission is so easy. :(
You are unfortunately just outside the time limit where you could reclaim any vet cost from the pet shop. https://www.theguineapigforum.co.uk/threads/what-to-check-and-look-out-for-in-new-guinea-pigs-vet-checks-sexing-parasites-illness.160378/

Hopefully, it won't develop into fungal; you should know in a day or two!
 
Top